Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

31 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Public land managers are asked to minimize fuel levels after fires, including using techniques such as salvage logging. They are also responsible for maintaining suitable wildlife habitat, especially for species of concern to state and federal agencies. An area where these responsibilities could conflict is in the use of salvage...
Author(s): Victoria A. Saab
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
The increased frequency and severity of large wildfires in the western United States is an important ecological and management issue with direct relevance to amphibian conservation. Although the knowledge of fire effects on amphibians in the region is still limited relative to most other vertebrate species, we reviewed the current...
Author(s): Blake R. Hossack, David S. Pilliod
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
description
Author(s): Kerri T. Vierling, Leigh B. Lentile
Year Published: 2008
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The primary weakness in our current ability to evaluate future landscapes in terms of wildlife lies in the lack of quantitative models linking wildlife to forest stand conditions, including fuels treatments. This project focuses on 1) developing statistical wildlife habitat relationships models (WHR) utilizing Forest Inventory and...
Author(s): Samuel A. Cushman, Kevin S. McKelvey
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Most prescribed fire plans focus on reducing wildfire hazards with little consideration given to effects on wildlife populations and their habitats. To evaluate effectiveness of prescribed burning in reducing fuels and to assess effects of fuels reduction on wildlife, we began a large-scale study known as the Birds and Burns Network...
Author(s): Victoria A. Saab, Lisa Bate, John F. Lehmkuhl, Brett G. Dickson, Scott Story, Stephanie Jentsch, William M. Block
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Snags create nesting, foraging, and roosting habitat for a variety of wildlife species. Removal of snags through postfire salvage logging reduces the densities and size classes of snags remaining after wildfire. We determined important variables associated with annual persistence rates (the probability a snag remains standing from 1...
Author(s): Robin E. Russell, Victoria A. Saab, Jonathan G. Dudley, Jay J. Rotella
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This paper synthesizes available information on the effects of hazardous fuel reduction treatments on terrestrial wildlife and invertebrates in dry coniferous forest types in the West. We focused on thinning and/or prescribed fire studies in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and dry-type Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), lodgepole...
Author(s): David S. Pilliod, Evelyn L. Bull, Jane L. Hayes, Barbara C. Wales
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
Fire is a dominant and highly visible disturbance in sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems. In lower elevation, xeric sagebrush communities, the role of fire has changed in recent decades from an infrequent disturbance maintaining a landscape mosaic and facilitating community processes to frequent events that alter sagebrush...
Author(s): Steve Knick, Aaron L. Holmes, Richard F. Miller
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Information about avian responses to fire in the U.S. Rocky Mountains is based solely on studies of crown fires. However, fire management in this region is based primarily on studies of low-elevation ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests maintained largely by frequent understory fires. In contrast to both of these trends, most...
Author(s): Victoria A. Saab, Hugh D. W. Powell, Natasha B. Kotliar, Karen R. Newlon
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Description not entered
Author(s): Richard Stevens
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).