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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

122 results


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Bark beetles are chewing a wide swath through forests across North America. Over the past few years, infestations have become epidemic in lodgepole and spruce-fir forests of the Intermountain West. The resulting extensive acreages of dead trees are alarming the public and raising concern about risk of severe fire. Researchers...
Author(s): Gail Wells
Year Published: 2012
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
The effects of wildfire on aquatic systems and fishes occurring in them has been linked to the direct or immediate influence of the fire on water quality and the indirect or subsequent effects on watershed characteristics and processes that influence water quality and quantity, stream channels, and aquatic biota (Gresswell 1999)....
Author(s): Bruce E. Rieman, Robert E. Gresswell, John N. Rinne
Year Published: 2012
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
Millions of trees killed by bark beetles in western North America have raised concerns about subsequent wildfire, but studies have reported a range of conclusions, often seemingly contradictory, about effects on fuels and wildfire. In this study, we reviewed and synthesized the published literature on modifications to fuels and fire...
Author(s): Jeffrey A. Hicke, Morris C. Johnson, Jane L. Hayes, Haiganoush K. Preisler
Year Published: 2012
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Extensive beetle outbreaks across western North American forests have spurred debates about how to best protect communities from wildfire. Previous work has found that fuels in the wildland-urban interface and especially in the defensible space (40-m radius) around structures are the most important determinants of the flammability...
Author(s): Glen Aronson, Dominik Kulakowski, Glen Aronson, Dominik Kulakowski
Year Published: 2012
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Bark beetle-caused tree mortality in conifer forests affects the quantity and quality of forest fuels and has long been assumed to increase fire hazard and potential fire behavior. In reality, bark beetles and their effects on fuel accumulation and subsequent fire hazard have only recently been described. We have extensively sampled...
Author(s): Michael J. Jenkins
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Periodic wildfire defines plant community composition and dynamics in many of the world's semi-arid biomes, whose climates and floras also favor wild bee diversity. Invasive flammable grasses, deforestation, historical fire suppression and human ignition are increasing fire frequency and intensifying its severity, as well as...
Author(s): James H. Cane, John L. Neff
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) has been declining across much of its range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain pine beetle epidemics, fire exclusion policies, and widespread exotic blister rust infections. Whitebark pine seed is dispersed by a bird, the Clark's nutcracker, which caches seed in open,...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Disturbance interactions have received growing interest in ecological research in the last decade. Fire and bark beetle outbreaks have recently increased in severity and extent across western North America, raising concerns about their possible interactions. Although it is often presumed that bark beetle outbreaks increase...
Author(s): Martin Simard, William H. Romme, Jacob M. Griffin, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent bark beetle outbreaks have resulted in the loss of hundreds of thousands of conifers on approximately 74 million acres (30 million hectares) of forest in western North America during the last decade. Stand conditions, drought, and warming temperatures have contributed to the severity of these outbreaks, particularly in high-...
Author(s): Michael J. Jenkins, Elizabeth G. Hebertson, Wesley G. Page, Wanda E. Lindquist
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
High elevation five-needle pines are rapidly declining throughout North America. The six species, whitebark (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.), limber (P. flexilis James), southwestern white (P. strobiformis Engelm.), foxtail (P. balfouriana Grev....
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Diana F. Tomback, Michael P. Murray, Cyndi M. Smith
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).