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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

113 results


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Climate-driven increases in disturbance frequency and extent augment the potential for compounded disturbances. Drawing on well-studied forests that experienced successive disturbances, we asked: (1) how does post-fire cover of litter, herbaceous cover and bare ground vary between stands affected by combinations of blow-down, insect...
Author(s): Nathan S. Gill, Daniel Jarvis, John Rogan, Dominik Kulakowski
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is one of the most prevalent disturbance agents in western conifer forests. It utilizes various species of pines (Pinus spp.) as host trees. Eruptive populations can cause extensive tree mortality. Since the late 1990s, extensive outbreaks have occurred from the southern...
Author(s): Jose F. Negron, Bob Cain
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Bark beetles are primary disturbance agents in western US forests. Outbreaks affect goods and services associated with forest ecosystems including timber, water, fish and wildlife habitats and populations, recreation opportunities, and many others. They can also affect wildfire behavior and its intensity. Assessments and evaluations...
Author(s): Daniel W. McCollum, John E. Lundquist
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
High-severity wildfires, which can homogenize floral communities, are becoming more common relative to historic mixed-severity fire regimes in the Northern Rockies of the U.S. High-severity wildfire could negatively affect bumble bees, which are typically diet generalists, if floral species of inadequate pollen quality dominate the...
Author(s): Michael P. Simanonok, Laura A. Burkle
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Edaphic (i.e. soil dwelling) microarthropods play crucial roles in soil ecosystem services. Fire is a widespread form of disturbance with severe effects on soil invertebrates. Research on the effects of fire on soil arthropods, however, has been mostly focused on surface-active species. Information on the effects of fire on strictly...
Author(s): Cristina Mantoni, Michele Di Musciano, Simone Fattorini
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the western United States, mountain pine beetles (MPBs) have caused tree mortality across 7% of the forested area over the past three decades, leading to concerns of increased fire activity in MPB-affected landscapes. While fire behavior modeling suggests MPB-associated changes in fuels may influence fire behavior, retrospective...
Author(s): Sarah J. Hart, Daniel L. Preston
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mountain pine beetles (MPB) are a constant presence in the Rocky Mountain Region, with a long history of periodic outbreaks. The latest beetle epidemic, which lasted from the late 1990s until about 2012, was particularly impactful in Colorado, where an estimated 800 million lodgepole and ponderosa pine trees were killed. However, as...
Author(s): Jose F. Negron, Robert J. Cain
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the western United States, restoration of forests with historically frequent, low‐severity fire regimes often includes fuel reduction that reestablish open, early‐seral conditions while reducing fuel continuity and loading. Between 2001 and 2016, fuel reduction (e.g., thinning, prescribed burning, etc.) was implemented on over 26...
Author(s): Justin S. Crotteau, Christopher R. Keyes, Sharon M. Hood, Andrew J. Larson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Aim: Understanding fire effects on pollinators is critical in the context of fire regime changes and the global pollination crisis. Through a systematic and quantitative review of the literature, we provide the first global assessment of pollinator responses to fire. We hypothesize that pollinators increase after fire and during the...
Author(s): Lucas M. Carbone, Julia Tavella, Juli G. Pausas, Ramiro Aguilar
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Millions of hectares of lodgepole pine trees have been affected by the recent mountain pine beetle outbreaks, which also left significant numbers of live host trees in some areas. Studies have primarily focused on the changes of forest conditions in post-outbreak stands, but whether such changes impact the growth, defense, and their...
Author(s): Shiyang Zhao, Jennifer G. Klutsch, Jonathan A. Cale, Nadir Erbilgin
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).