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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are nearly 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

417 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Prescribed burning is a primary tool for habitat restoration and management in fire-adapted grasslands. Concerns about detrimental effects of burning on butterfly populations, however, can inhibit implementation of treatments. Burning in cool and humid conditions is likely to result in lowered soil temperatures and to produce...
Author(s): Kathryn C. Hill, Jonathan D. Bakker, Peter W. Dunwiddie
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Diana Six has been studying pine bark beetles for 25 years, and still can’t say she completely understands them. Lately, she’s been diving into a topic she has always found even more confounding - forest management. This article describes an interview with Six that describes forest resilience in face of climate change.
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Previous studies have suggested that bark beetles and fires can be interacting disturbances, whereby bark beetle–caused tree mortality can alter the risk and severity of subsequent wildland fires. However, there remains considerable uncertainty around the type and magnitude of the interaction between fires following bark beetle...
Author(s): Carolyn Hull Sieg, Rodman Linn, F. Pimont, Chad M. Hoffman, Joel D. McMillin, Judith Winterkamp, Scott L. Baggett
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Decline in biodiversity have increased the interest in alternative forest management approaches. Unevenaged silviculture has been proposed as a mean to maintain continuity of forest canopy cover, mimic small-scale disturbances and provide a stratified forest structure similar to that of old-growth forests and therefore better...
Author(s): Klara Joelsson, Joakim Hjältén, Timothy Work, Heloise Gibb, Jean-Michel Roberge, Therese Löfroth
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
An increasing number of threats, both natural (e.g. fires, drought) and anthropogenic (e.g. agriculture, infrastructure development), are likely to affect both availability and quality of plants that grouse rely on for cover and food. As such, there is an increasing need to monitor plants and their use by grouse over space and time...
Author(s): Jennifer Sorensen Forbey, Gail L. Patricelli, Donna M. Delparte, Alan H. Krakauer, Peter J. Olsoy, Marcella R. Fremgen, Jordan D. Nobler, Lucas P. Spaete, Lisa A. Shipley, Janet L. Rachlow, Amy K. Dirksen, Anna Perry, Bryce A. Richardson, Nancy F. Glenn
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Dispersal can strongly influence the demographic and evolutionary trajectory of populations. For many species, little is known about dispersal, despite its importance to conservation. The Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a species of conservation concern that ranges across 11 western U.S. states and 2 Canadian...
Author(s): Todd Cross, David E. Naugle, John Carlson, Michael K. Schwartz
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the interior Pacific Northwest, extensive defoliation of mixed conifer forests during outbreaks of western spruce budworm (WSB) may leave the visual impression of a tinderbox with trees primed to burst into flame. But is this the case? We addressed this question with funding from the USDA/U.S. Department of the Interior Joint...
Author(s): Daniel G. Gavin, Aquila Flower, Greg M. Cohn, Russell A. Parsons, Emily K. Heyerdahl
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Aridland riparian ecosystems are limited, the climate is changing, and further hydrological change is likely in the American Southwest. To protect riparian ecosystems and organisms, we need to understand how they are affected by disturbance processes and stressors such as fire, drought, and non-native plant invasions. Riparian...
Author(s): D. Max Smith, Deborah M. Finch
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are threatened by a continued loss of sagebrush (Artemisia ssp.) habitat. Recent, large scale wildfires have elevated the risk to sage-grouse as it may take up to several decades to more than a century for naturally recovery of sage-grouse habitat (i.e. reestablishment of sagebrush)....
Author(s): Kirk W. Davies, Matthew Madsen, Chad S. Boyd, Michael A. Gregg, April Hulet, Urban Strachan
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Evidence of increasing fire extent and severity in the western US in recent decades has raised concern over the effects of fire on threatened species such as the spotted owl (Strix occidentalis Xantus de Vesey), which nests in forests with large trees and high canopy cover that are vulnerable to high-severity wildfire. A dichotomy...
Author(s): Joseph L. Ganey, Ho Yi Wan, Samuel A. Cushman, Christina D. Vojta
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).