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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

446 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Non‐linear and interacting effects of fire severity and time since fire may help explain how pyrodiversity promotes biodiversity in fire‐adapted systems. We built on previous research on avian responses to fire by investigating how complex effects of burn severity and time since fire influenced avian community composition across the...
Author(s): Paul J. Taillie, Ryan D. Burnett, Lance J. Roberts, Brent R. Campos, M. Nils Peterson, Christopher E. Moorman
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire is a dominant, and well-studied, structuring force in many temperate and semi-arid communities; yet, few studies have investigated the effects of fire on multi-trophic interactions. Here, we ask how fire-induced changes in flowering affect the abundance of bumble bee foragers (Bombus vosnesenskii) and whether differences in...
Author(s): John M. Mola, Neal M. Williams
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the northern Rocky Mountains of the U.S. and Canada, whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) is a functionally important species in treeline communities. The introduced fungal pathogen Cronartium ribicola, which causes white pine blister rust, has led to extensive whitebark pine mortality nearly rangewide. We examined four...
Author(s): Aaron C. Wagner, Diana F. Tomback, Lynn M. Resler, Elizabeth R. Pansing
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Managers require quantitative yet tractable tools that identify areas for restoration yielding effective benefits for targeted wildlife species and the ecosystems they inhabit. As a contemporary example of high national significance for conservation, the persistence of Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Great...
Author(s): Mark A. Ricca, Peter S. Coates, K. Benjamin Gustafson, Brianne E. Brussee, Jeanne C. Chambers, Shawn Espinosa, Scott C. Gardner, Sherri Lisius, Pilar Ziegler, David J. Delehanty, Michael L. Casazza
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding the impacts of mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) on fire behavior is important from both an ecological and land management viewpoint. However, numerous uncertainties exist in the linkages of MPB-caused tree mortality to changes in canopy and surface fuels (e.g., fuel loading, arrangement, and...
Author(s): Sharon M. Hood, Robert E. Keane, Helen Y. Smith, Joel M. Egan, Lisa M. Holsinger
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Fire-maintained pine (Pinus spp.) forests, characterized by a diverse herbaceous layer, sparse midstory layer, and a dominant pine overstory, once covered approximately 30 million ha in the southeastern United States. Fire suppression, landscape changes, and land management changes have contributed to reduced suitability of many...
Author(s): Raymond B. Iglay, Rachel E. Greene, Bruce D. Leopold, Darren A. Miller
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Interactions between fire and nonnative, annual plant species (that is, “the grass/fire cycle”) represent one of the greatest threats to sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems and associated wildlife, including the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). In 2015, U.S. Department of the Interior called for a “science-based...
Author(s): Douglas J. Shinneman, Cameron L. Aldridge, Peter S. Coates, Matthew J. Germino, David S. Pilliod, Nicole M. Vaillant
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Prescribed burning is a primary tool for habitat restoration and management in fire-adapted grasslands. Concerns about detrimental effects of burning on butterfly populations, however, can inhibit implementation of treatments. Burning in cool and humid conditions is likely to result in lowered soil temperatures and to produce...
Author(s): Kathryn C. Hill, Jonathan D. Bakker, Peter W. Dunwiddie
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The most recent mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak in British Columbia (BC), which began in the late 1990s, killed ∼54% of the mature merchantable lodgepole pine and was expected to impact gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (R) and thus net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of infested...
Author(s): Gesa Meyer, T. Andrew Black, Rachhpal S. Jassal, Zoran Nesic, Nicholas C. Coops, Andreas Christen, Arthur L. Fredeen, David L. Spittlehouse, Nicholas J. Grant, Vanessa N. Foord, Rebecca Bowler
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Droughts and insect outbreaks are primary disturbance processes linking climate change to tree mortality in western North America. Refugia from these disturbances—locations where impacts are less severe relative to the surrounding landscape—may be priorities for conservation, restoration, and monitoring. In this study, hypotheses...
Author(s): Jennifer Cartwright
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).