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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

131 results


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The fire plume height (smoke injection height) is an important parameter for calculating the transport and lifetime of smoke particles, which can significantly affect regional and global air quality and atmospheric radiation budget. To develop an observation‐based global fire plume‐rise dataset, a modified one‐dimensional plume‐rise...
Author(s): Ziming Ke, Yuhang Wang, Yufei Zou, Yongjia Song, Yongqiang Liu
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In recent years wildland fires in the United States have had significant impacts on local and regional air quality and negative human health outcomes. Although the primary health concerns from wildland fires come from fine particulate matter (PM2:5), large increases in ozone (O3) have been observed downwind of wildland fire plumes (...
Author(s): Russell W. Long, Andrew Whitehill, Andrew Habel, Shawn P. Urbanski, Hannah Halliday, Maribel Colón, Surender Kaushik, Matthew S. Landis
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Exceptional events occur when air pollution in a specific location exceeds the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) due to an event that cannot be reasonably attributed to human activities, such as a wildland fire. Ground-level ozone (O3) and particulate matter (PM) are Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria...
Author(s): Liji M. David, A. R. Ravishankara, Steven J. Brey, Emily V. Fischer, John Volckens, Sonia M. Kreidenweis
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Smoke, as a prominent character of combustion, is widely regarded as a signal of forest fire. Existing in a video-based smoke root detection methods on rely the distance between smoke and the lens, which is one of the most challenging parts. In relatively close distances, the dynamic region extraction method not only presents...
Author(s): Yu Gao, Pengle Cheng
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland firefighters are repeatedly exposed to elevated levels of wildland fire smoke (WFS) while protecting lives and properties from wildland fires. Studies reporting personal exposure concentrations of air pollutants in WFS during fire suppression or prescribed burn activities have been geographically limited to the western and...
Author(s): Chieh-Ming Wu, Chi Song, Ryan Chartier, Jacob Kremer, Luke P. Naeher, Olorunfemi Adetona
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire spread associated with violent pyrogenic convection is highly unpredictable and difficult to suppress. Wildfire-driven convection may generate cumulonimbus (storm) clouds, also known as pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb). Research into such phenomena has tended to treat the fire on the surface and convection in the atmosphere above as...
Author(s): Rachel Badlan, J. Sharples, Jason P. Evans, Richard H. D. McRae
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fires can emit substantial amounts of air pollution that may pose a risk to those in proximity (e.g., first responders, nearby residents) as well as downwind populations. Quickly deploying air pollution measurement capabilities in response to incidents has been limited to date by the cost, complexity of implementation, and...
Author(s): Matthew S. Landis, Russell W. Long, Jonathan Krug, Maribel Colón, Robert Vanderpool, Andrew Habel, Shawn P. Urbanski
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent dramatic and deadly increases in global wildfire activity have increased attention on the causes of wildfires, their consequences, and how risk from wildfire might be mitigated. Here we bring together data on the changing risk and societal burden of wildfire in the United States. We estimate that nearly 50 million homes are...
Author(s): Marshall Burke, Anne Driscoll, Sam Heft-Neal, Jiani Xue, Jennifer Burney, Michael Wara
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The 2020 fire season in the western United States (the West) has been staggering: over 2.5 million ha have burned as of 31 September, including over 1.5 million ha in California (3.7% of the state), in part from five of the six largest fires in state history; over 760,000 ha have burned in Oregon and Washington, most occurring...
Author(s): Philip E. Higuera, John T. Abatzoglou
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire smoke is a growing public health concern in the United States. Numerous studies have documented associations between ambient smoke exposure and severe patient outcomes for single fire seasons or limited geographic regions. However, there are few national‐scale health studies of wildfire smoke in the U.S., few studies...
Author(s): Cecilia Sorensen, John A. House, Katelyn O'Dell, Steven J. Brey, Bonne Ford, Jeffrey R. Pierce, Emily V. Fischer, Jay Lemery, James L. Crooks
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).