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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are nearly 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

61 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

The wildland fires of 2000, 2002, and 2003 created many opportunities to conduct post-fire logging operations in the Inland Northwest. Relatively little information is available on the impact of post-fire logging on long-term soil productivity or on the best method for monitoring these changes. We present a USDA Forest Service...
Author(s): Deborah S. Page-Dumroese, Martin F. Jurgensen, Ann Abbott, Thomas M. Rice, Joanne M. Tirocke, Sue Farley, Sharon DeHart
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
The bird species in western North America that are most restricted to, and therefore most dependent on, severely burned conifer forests during the first years following a fire event depend heavily on the abundant standing snags for perch sites, nest sites, and food resources. Thus, it is critical to develop and apply appropriate...
Author(s): Richard L. Hutto
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Snags create nesting, foraging, and roosting habitat for a variety of wildlife species. Removal of snags through postfire salvage logging reduces the densities and size classes of snags remaining after wildfire. We determined important variables associated with annual persistence rates (the probability a snag remains standing from 1...
Author(s): Robin E. Russell, Victoria A. Saab, Jonathan G. Dudley, Jay J. Rotella
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The management of fire-prone forests is one of the most controversial natural resource issues in the US today, particularly in the west of the country. Although vegetation and wildlife in these forests are adapted to fire, the historical range of fire frequency and severity was huge. When fire regimes are altered by human activity,...
Author(s): Reed F. Noss, Jerry F. Franklin, William L. Baker, Tania L. Schoennagel, Peter B. Moyle
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
We reviewed the behavior of wildfire in riparian zones, primarily in the western United States, and the potential ecological consequences of postfire logging. Fire behavior in riparian zones is complex, but many aquatic and riparian organisms exhibit a suite of adaptations that allow relatively rapid recovery after fire. Unless...
Author(s): Gordon H. Reeves, Peter A. Bisson, Bruce E. Rieman, Lee E. Benda
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Information about avian responses to fire in the U.S. Rocky Mountains is based solely on studies of crown fires. However, fire management in this region is based primarily on studies of low-elevation ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests maintained largely by frequent understory fires. In contrast to both of these trends, most...
Author(s): Victoria A. Saab, Hugh D. W. Powell, Natasha B. Kotliar, Karen R. Newlon
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Recent changes in the forest policies, regulations, and laws affecting public lands encourage postfire salvage logging, an activity that all too often delays or prevents recovery. In contrast, the 10 recommendations proposed here can improve the condition of watersheds and aquatic ecosystems.
Author(s): James R. Karr, Jonathan J. Rhodes, G. Wayne Minshall, F. Richard Hauer, Robert L. Beschta, Christopher A. Frissell, David A. Perry
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The [authors][1] of this Policy Forum examine a range of issues associated with salvage harvesting policies after major natural disturbances such as fire, windstorms, and volcanic eruptions. Although natural disturbances can have important benefits for ecosystems, salvage harvesting can have major negative impacts on ecosystem...
Author(s): David B. Lindenmayer, D. R. Foster, Jerry F. Franklin, M. L. Hunter, Reed F. Noss, Fiona K. A. Schmiegelow, David A. Perry
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest ecosystems in the western United States evolved over many millennia in response to disturbances such as wildfires. Land use and management practices have altered these ecosystems, however, including fire regimes in some areas. Forest ecosystems are especially vulnerable to postfire management practices because such practices...
Author(s): Robert L. Beschta, Jonathan J. Rhodes, J. Boone Kauffman, Robert E. Gresswell, G. Wayne Minshall, James R. Karr, David A. Perry, F. Richard Hauer, Christopher A. Frissell
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Synthesis of published research on the responses of stream benthic macroinvertebrates to fire in western United States indicates a consistent pattern of response that can guide resource management and future research. Direct effects of fire generally are minor or indiscernible. Indirect effects, resulting primarily from increased...
Author(s): G. Wayne Minshall
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).