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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

443 results



Numerous studies have documented significant change in conifer forests of the American West following the cessation of recurrent fire at the end of the 19th century. But the successional dynamics that characterize different forested settings in the absence of fire remain poorly understood. This study reconstructs structural and...
Author(s): James D. Johnston
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mastication is a wildland fuel treatment technique that is rapidly becoming popular with fire managers for fire hazard reduction projects, especially in areas where reducing fuels with prescribed fire is particularly challenging. Mastication is the process of mechanically modifying the live and dead surface and canopy biomass by...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Pamela G. Sikkink, Theresa B. Jain, James J. Reardon
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Spatial wildfire suppression costs regressions have been re-estimated at a more disaggregated level for the nine Geographic Area Coordination Center (GACC’s) regions using five years of data for fires involving National Forests. Results of these revised regression determined that only in the California GACCs did mechanical fuel...
Author(s): Armando Gonzalez-Caban, John B. Loomis, Robin Reich, Douglas B. Rideout, José J. Sánchez
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wild and prescribed fire-induced injury to forest trees can produce immediate or delayed tree mortality but fire-injured trees can also survive. Land managers use logistic regression models that incorporate tree-injury variables to discriminate between fatally injured trees and those that will survive. We used data from 4024...
Author(s): Lisa Ganio, Robert A. Progar
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy recognizes that wildfire is a necessary natural process in many ecosystems and strives to reduce conflicts between fire-prone landscapes and people. In an effort to mitigate potential negative wildfire impacts proactively, the Forest Service fuels program reduces wildland fuels...
Author(s): Nicole M. Vaillant, Elizabeth D. Reinhardt
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Restoration treatments in dry forests of the western US often attempt silvicultural practices to restore the historical characteristics of forest structure and fire behavior. However, it is suggested that a reliance on non-spatial metrics of forest stand structure, along with the use of wildland fire behavior models that lack the...
Author(s): J. Ziegler, Chad M. Hoffman, Michael A. Battaglia, William E. Mell
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest restoration often includes thinning to reduce tree density and improve ecosystem processes and function while also reducing the risk of wildfire or insect and disease outbreaks. However, one drawback of these restoration treatments is that slash is often burned in piles that may damage the soil and require further restoration...
Author(s): Deborah S. Page-Dumroese, Matt Busse, Jim Archuleta, Darren McAvoy, Eric Roussel
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Each year, fuel treatments reduce the likelihood of uncharacteristically severe wildland fire in overstocked stands across millions of acres in the United States. Typically, these treatments target small-diameter trees for removal, producing large amounts of unmerchantable material and increasing surface fuels. Currently, few...
Author(s): Alexander M. Evans, Clinton S. Wright
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The growing frequency of large wildland fires has raised awareness of the ‘wildfire paradox’ and the ‘firefighting trap’ that are both rooted in the fire exclusion paradigm. However, a paradigm shift has been unfolding in the wildland fire community that seeks to restore fire ecology processes across broad landscapes. This would...
Author(s): Timothy Ingalsbee
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Timber harvesting operations generate brush and other vegetative debris, which often has no marketable value. In many western U.S. forests, these materials represent a fire hazard and a potential threat to forest health and must be removed or burned for disposal. Currently, there is no established, consistent method to estimate...
Author(s): Dan R. Loeffler, Stu Hoyt, Nathaniel Anderson
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).