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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

396 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Wildfire disaster risks are being heighted globally due to climate change. Here, we present a United States-based wildfire case study of the northern Rocky Mountains to investigate links between wildfire experience, knowledge, and perceived risk due to climate change and potential policy support for two internationally relevant...
Author(s): Christopher A. Craig, Myria W. Allen, Song Feng, Matthew L. Spialek
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Worldwide, regularly recurring wildfires shape many peatland ecosystems to the extent that fire‐adapted species often dominate plant communities, suggesting that wildfire is an integral part of peatland ecology rather than an anomaly. The most destructive blazes are smoldering fires that are usually initiated in periods of drought...
Author(s): Neal E. Flanagan, Hongjun Wang, Scott Winton, Curtis J. Richardson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Sagebrush (Artemisia species) habitat, an intricate, species-rich mosaic of different sagebrush species and a remarkably diverse assemblage of grasses, forbs, and other shrubs, once covered about 170 million acres (69 million ha) across the Western United States (fig. 4.3.1). Noss et al. (1995) note that sagebrush habitat is an...
Author(s): R. Kasten Dumroese
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
California’s high density, fire-excluded forests experienced an extreme drought accompanied by warmer than normal temperatures from 2012 to 2015, resulting in the deaths of millions of trees. We examined tree mortality and growth of mixed-conifer stands that had been experimentally treated between 2011 and 2013 with two different...
Author(s): Eric E. Knapp, Alexis Bernal, Jeffrey M. Kane, Christopher J. Fettig, Malcolm P. North
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires are common across the Pacific Northwest, however climate change is projected to cause increases in wildfire activity and severity. Wildfires create a heterogeneous pattern across the landscape from severely burned areas to unburned patches. Unburned areas that are associated with critical habitat where biota can persist (e...
Author(s): Arjan J. H. Meddens, Andrew T. Hudak, Crystal A. Kolden
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wildfires are a significant agent of disturbance in forests and highly sensitive to climate change. Short-interval fires and high severity (mortality-causing) fires in particular, may catalyze rapid and substantial ecosystem shifts by eliminating woody species and triggering conversions from forest to shrub or grassland ecosystems....
Author(s): Brian Buma, Shelby A. Weiss, Kathy Geier-Hayes, Melissa S. Lucash
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Changing disturbance regimes and climate can overcome forest ecosystem resilience. Following high-severity fire, forest recovery may be compromised by lack of tree seed sources, warmer and drier postfire climate, or short-interval reburning. A potential outcome of the loss of resilience is the conversion of the prefire forest to a...
Author(s): Jonathan D. Coop, Sean A. Parks, Camille Stevens-Rumann, Shelley Crausbay, Philip E. Higuera, Matthew D. Hurteau, Alan J. Tepley, Ellen Whitman, Timothy J. Assal, Brandon M. Collins, Kimberley T. Davis, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Donald A. Falk, Paula J. Fornwalt, Peter Z. Fule, Brian J. Harvey, Van R. Kane, Caitlin E. Littlefield, Ellis Q. Margolis, Malcolm P. North, Marc-Andre Parisien, Susan J. Prichard, Kyle Rodman
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Stream drying and wildfire are projected to increase with climate change in the western United States, and both are likely to impact stream chemistry patterns and processes. To investigate drying and wildfire effects on stream chemistry (carbon, nutrients, anions, cations, and isotopes), we examined seasonal drying in two...
Author(s): Ruth B. MacNeille, Kathleen A. Lohse, Sarah E. Godsey, Julia N. Perdrial, Colden V. Baxter
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Robust tree regeneration following high‐severity wildfire is key to the resilience of subalpine and boreal forests, and 21st century climate could initiate abrupt change in forests if postfire temperature and soil moisture become less suitable for tree seedling establishment. Using two widespread conifer species, lodgepole pine (...
Author(s): Winslow D. Hansen, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires are increasing in frequency, severity, and size in many parts of the world. Forest fires can fundamentally affect snowpack and watershed hydrology by restructuring forest composition and structure. Topography is an important factor in snowpack accumulation and ablation as it influences exposure to solar radiation and...
Author(s): Jordan D. Maxwell, Anson Call, Samuel B. St. Clair
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).