Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

447 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

The 2020 fire season in the western United States (the West) has been staggering: over 2.5 million ha have burned as of 31 September, including over 1.5 million ha in California (3.7% of the state), in part from five of the six largest fires in state history; over 760,000 ha have burned in Oregon and Washington, most occurring...
Author(s): Philip E. Higuera, John T. Abatzoglou
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The acute stress response is a cornerstone of animal behavior research, but little is currently understood about how responses to acute stressors (i.e. discrete noxious stimuli) may be altered in future climates. As climate change ensues, animals may experience chronic stress due to persistent warmer temperatures and environmental...
Author(s): Camdon B. Kay, David J. Delehanty, Devaleena S. Pradhan, Joshua B. Grinath
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent extreme wildfire seasons in several regions have been associated with exceptionally hot, dry conditions, made more probable by climate change. Much research has focused on extreme fire weather and its drivers, but natural wildfire regimes – and their interactions with human activities – are far from being comprehensively...
Author(s): Sandy P. Harrison, Iain Colin Prentice, Keith J. Bloomfield, Ning Dong, Matthias Forkel, Matthew Forrest, Ramesh K. Ningthoujam, Adam F. A. Pellegrini, Yicheng Shen, Mara Baudena, Anabelle W. Cardoso, Jessica C. Huss, Jaideep Joshi, I Oliveras, Juli G. Pausas, Kimberley J. Simpson
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent dramatic and deadly increases in global wildfire activity have increased attention on the causes of wildfires, their consequences, and how risk from wildfire might be mitigated. Here we bring together data on the changing risk and societal burden of wildfire in the United States. We estimate that nearly 50 million homes are...
Author(s): Marshall Burke, Anne Driscoll, Sam Heft-Neal, Jiani Xue, Jennifer Burney, Michael Wara
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate change is expected to increase fire activity in many regions of the globe, but the relative role of human vs. lightning-caused ignitions on future fire regimes is unclear. We developed statistical models that account for the spatiotemporal ignition patterns by cause in the eastern slopes of the Cascades in Oregon, USA....
Author(s): Ana M. G. Barros, Michelle A. Day, Haiganoush K. Preisler, John T. Abatzoglou, Meg A. Krawchuk, Rachel M. Houtman, Alan A. Ager
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent wildfires in the western United States have led to substantial economic losses and social stresses. There is a great concern that the new climatic state may further increase the intensity, duration, and frequency of wildfires. To examine temporal and spatial features of historical wildfire trends and future changes, a common...
Author(s): Emily K. Brown, Jiali Wang, Yan Feng
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
We review science-based adaptation strategies for western North American (wNA) forests that include restoring active fire regimes and fostering resilient structure and composition of forested landscapes. As part of the review, we address common questions associated with climate adaptation and realignment treatments that run counter...
Author(s): Susan J. Prichard, Paul F. Hessburg, R. Keala Hagmann, Nicholas A. Povak, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Matthew D. Hurteau, Van R. Kane, Robert E. Keane, Leda N. Kobziar, Crystal A. Kolden, Malcolm P. North, Sean A. Parks, Hugh Safford, Jens T. Stevens, Larissa L. Yocom, Derek J. Churchill, Robert W. Gray, David W. Huffman, Frank K. Lake, Pratima Khatri-Chhetri
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Determining whether forest landscapes can maintain their resilience to fire – that is, their ability to rebound and sustain – given rapid climate change and increasing fire activity is a pressing challenge throughout the American West. Many western forests are well adapted to fire, and even subalpine forests that experience...
Author(s): Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
This feature explores topics of enduring ecological concern – fire regimes, climate change, and forest management of the North American West. The authors describe the dual challenges of past forest management legacies and fire exclusion confronted by a changing fire regime due to the coupling of stark climatic changes and abundant...
Author(s): David S. Schimel, Juan C. Corley
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Stephens et al. (2020) do an excellent job of encouraging us to sharpen our focus on the ecological consequences of forest and fire management activities, but at the same time they did not emphasize that those consequences differ substantially among forest types. Even though Stephens et al. clearly state that their comments apply...
Author(s): Richard L. Hutto
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).