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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

395 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Changing climate and disturbance regimes are increasingly challenging the resilience of forest ecosystems around the globe. A powerful indicator for the loss of resilience is regeneration failure, that is, the inability of the prevailing tree species to regenerate after disturbance. Regeneration failure can result from the interplay...
Author(s): Werner Rammer, Kristin H. Braziunas, Winslow D. Hansen, Zakary Ratajczak, Anthony L. Westerling, Monica G. Turner, Rupert Seidl
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increased demand for timber, the reduction in the available timber resources, and more frequent and severe forest fires under a changing climate have increased the use of salvage logging in North American forests despite concerns regarding impacts on biodiversity and long-term forest productivity. We aimed to complement previous...
Author(s): Fidèle Bognounou, Lisa A. Venier, Steven L. Van Wilgenburg, Isabelle Aubin, Jean-Noel Candau, Andre Arsenault, Christian Hebert, Jacques Ibarzabal, Samantha J. Song, Louis De Grandpré
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Humans have both intentional and unintentional impacts on their environment, yet identifying the enduring ecological legacies of past small-scale societies remains difficult, and as such, evidence is sparse. The present study found evidence of an ecological legacy that persists today within an semiarid ecosystem of western North...
Author(s): Bruce M. Pavlik, Lisbeth A. Louderback, Kenneth B. Vernon, Peter M. Yaworsky, Cynthia Wilson, Arnold Clifford, Brian F. Codding
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Western North American fires have been increasing in magnitude and severity over the last few decades. The complex coupling of fires with the atmospheric energy budget and meteorology creates short-term feedbacks on regional weather altering the amount of pollution to which Americans are exposed. Using a combination of model...
Author(s): Diana N. Bernstein, Douglas S. Hamilton, Rosalie Krasnoff, Natalie M. Mahowald, David S. Connelly, Simone Tilmes, Peter G. M. Hess
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Multiple, simultaneous environmental changes, in climatic/abiotic factors, interacting species, and direct human influences, are impacting natural populations and thus biodiversity, ecosystem services, and evolutionary trajectories. Determining whether the magnitudes of the population impacts of abiotic, biotic, and anthropogenic...
Author(s): William F. Morris, Johan Ehrlén, Johan P. Dahlgren, Alexander K. Loomis, Allison M. Louthan
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Background: Wildfires produce pyrogenic carbon (PyC) through the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and its chemical characterization is critical to understanding carbon (C) budgets and ecosystem functions in forests. Across western North American forests, fires are burning through landscapes with substantial tree mortality...
Author(s): Anna C. Talucci, Lauren M. Matosziuk, Jeff A. Hatten, Meg A. Krawchuk
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This research note seeks to draw attention to the potential impact of social media climate change debates on the Australian tourism industry during and after the devastating 2019-2020 Australian bushfires. Whilst acknowledging the tremendous role of all media forms in the emergency management response, the present paper argues that...
Author(s): Stephen Schweinsberg, Simon Darcy, David Beirman
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
BACKGROUND: Fire has shaped the diversity of life on Earth for millions of years. Variation in fire regimes continues to be a source of biodiversity across the globe, and many plants, animals, and ecosystems depend on particular temporal and spatial patterns of fire. Although people have been using fire to modify environments for...
Author(s): Luke T. Kelly, Katherine M. Giljohann, Andrea Duane, Núria Aquilué
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire activity has a huge impact on human lives. Different models have been proposed to predict fire activity, which can be classified into global and regional ones. Global fire models focus on longer timescale simulations and can be very complex. Regional fire models concentrate on seasonal forecasting but usually require inputs...
Author(s): Leonardo N. Ferreira, Didier A. Vega-Oliveros, Liang Zhao, Manoel F. Cardoso, Elbert E.N. Macau
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Using observations and model simulations (ESM 4.1) during 1988–2018, we show large year‐to‐year variability in western U.S. PM2.5 pollution caused by regional and distant fires. Widespread wildfires, combined with stagnation, caused summer PM2.5 pollution in 2017 and 2018 to exceed 2 standard deviations over long‐term averages. ESM...
Author(s): Yuanyu Xie, Meiyun Lin, Larry W. Horowitz
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).