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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

263 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Forest land managers rely on predictions of tree mortality generated from fire behavior models to identify stands for post-fire salvage and to design fuel reduction treatments that reduce mortality. A key challenge in improving the accuracy of these predictions is selecting appropriate wind and fuel moisture inputs. Our objective...
Author(s): Jason S. Barker, Jeremy S. Fried, Andrew N. Grey
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Conifer forests of the western US are historically well adapted to wildfires, but current warming is creating novel disturbance regimes that may fundamentally change future forest dynamics. Stand‐replacing fires can catalyze forest reorganization by providing periodic opportunities for establishment of new tree cohorts that set the...
Author(s): M. Allison Stegner, Monica G. Turner, Virginia Iglesias, Cathy L. Whitlock
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Erosion of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) following severe wildfire may have deleterious effects on downstream resources and ecosystem recovery. Although C and N losses in combustion and runoff have been studied extensively, soil C and N transported by post-fire erosion has rarely been quantified in burned landscapes. To better...
Author(s): Derek N. Pierson, Peter R. Robichaud, Charles C. Rhoades, Robert E. Brown
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Following high-severity wildfire, application of mulch on the soil surface is commonly used to stabilize slopes and limit soil erosion potential, protecting ecosystem values at risk. Despite the widespread use of mulch, relatively little is known about its effects on ecosystem recovery and soil processes important for plant re-...
Author(s): Jayne L. Jonas, Erin Berryman, Brett Wolk, Penelope Morgan, Peter R. Robichaud
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire alters vegetation cover and soil hydrologic properties, substantially increasing the likelihood of debris flows in steep watersheds. Our understanding of initiation mechanisms of post‐wildfire debris flows is limited, in part, by a lack of direct observations and measurements. In particular, there is a need to understand...
Author(s): Luke A. McGuire, Francis K. Rengers, Jason W. Kean, Dennis M. Staley, Joel B. Smith
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate and land use changes have led to recent increases in fire size, severity, and/or frequency in many different geographic regions and ecozones. Most post‐wildfire geomorphology studies focus on the impact of a single wildfire but changing wildfire regimes underscore the need to quantify the effects of repeated disturbance by...
Author(s): Luke A. McGuire, Ann M. Youberg
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate change is expected to cause widespread shifts in the distribution and abundance of plant species through direct impacts on mortality, regeneration, and survival. At landscape scales, climate impacts will be strongly mediated by disturbances, such as wildfire, which catalyze shifts in species distributions through widespread...
Author(s): Kerry Kemp, Philip E. Higuera, Penelope Morgan, John T. Abatzoglou
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Stand structure and fuel mass were measured in 2011, 13 years after logging of a seasonally dry, ponderosa pine-dominated forest that had burned severely in the 1996 Summit Wildfire, Malheur National Forest, northeastern Oregon, U.S.A. Data are compared to those taken one year after post-fire logging (1999), and analyzed in the...
Author(s): James D. McIver, Roger D. Ottmar
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires, insect outbreaks, and windstorms are increasingly common forest disturbances. Post-disturbance management often involves salvage logging, i.e., the felling and removal of the affected trees; however, this practice may represent an additional disturbance with effects on ecosystem processes and services. We developed a...
Author(s): Alexandro B. Leverkus, José María Rey Benayas, Jorge Castro, Dominique Boucher, Stephen Brewer, Brandon M. Collins, Daniel C. Donato, Shawn Fraver, Barbara E. Kishchuk, Eun-Jae Lee, David B. Lindenmayer, Emanuele Lingua, Ellen Macdonald, Raffaella Marzano, Charles C. Rhoades, Alejandro A. Royo, Simon Thorn, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner, Kaysandra Waldron, Thomas Wohlgemuth, Lena Gustafsson
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Reestablishment of perennial vegetation is often needed after wildfires to limit exotic species and restore ecosystem services. However, there is growing body of evidence that questions if seeding after wildfires increases perennial vegetation and reduces exotic plants. The concern that seeding may not meet restoration goals is even...
Author(s): Kirk W. Davies, Jonathan D. Bates, Chad S. Boyd
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).