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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

189 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Are exotic plant species favoured by non-native ungulate herbivores and disadvantaged by native herbivores in forested rangelands? Do the impacts of ungulates on exotic vs native plants depend on forest management activities such as prescribed fire and stand thinning? Location: Northeastern Oregon, USA. Methods: We recorded changes...
Author(s): Burak K. Pekin, Michael J. Wisdom, Catherine G. Parks, Bryan A. Endress, Bridgett J. Naylor
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Post-wildfire flooding and erosion can threaten lives, property and natural resources. Increased peak flows and sediment delivery due to the loss of surface vegetation cover and fire-induced changes in soil properties are of great concern to public safety. Burn severity maps derived from remote sensing data reflect fire-induced...
Author(s): Mary Ellen Miller, William J. Elliot, Peter R. Robichaud, Kevin A. Endsley
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Disturbance and succession have long been of interest in ecology, but how landscape patterns of ecosystem structure and function evolve following large disturbances is poorly understood. After nearly 25 years, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) forests that regenerated after the 1988 Yellowstone Fires (Wyoming, USA)...
Author(s): Monica G. Turner, Timothy G. Whitby, Daniel B. Tinker, William H. Romme
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Aim Climate warming and increased wildfire activity are hypothesized to catalyse biogeographical shifts, reducing the resilience of fire‐prone forests world‐wide. Two key mechanisms underpinning hypotheses are: (1) reduced seed availability in large stand‐replacing burn patches, and (2) reduced seedling establishment/survival after...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Post-fire forest management commonly requires accepting some negative ecological impacts from management activities in order to achieve management objectives. Managers need to know, however, whether ecological impacts from post-fire management activities are transient or cause long-term ecosystem degradation. We studied the long-...
Author(s): David W. Peterson, Erich K. Dodson
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Identifying where animals come from during population recovery can help to understand the impacts of disturbance events and regimes on species distributions and genetic diversity. Alternative recovery processes for animal populations affected by fire include external recolonization, nucleated recovery from refuges, or in situ...
Author(s): Sam C. Banks, Lachlan McBurney, David Blair, Ian D. Davies, David B. Lindenmayer
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Salvage logging following windthrow is common throughout forests worldwide even though the practice is often considered inimical to forest recovery. Because salvaging removes trees, crushes seedlings, and compacts soils, many warn this practice may delay succession, suppress diversity, and alter composition. Here, over 8 yr...
Author(s): Alejandro A. Royo, Chris J. Peterson, John Stuart Stanovick, Walter P. Carson
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy (hereafter Strategy, DOI 2015) outlined the need for coordinated, science-based adaptive management to achieve long-term protection, conservation, and restoration of the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystem. A key component of this management approach is the...
Author(s): Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy Actionable Science Plan Team
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Management or Planning Document
The environmental effect of extreme soil heating, such as occurs with the complete combustion of large downed wood during wildfires, is a post-fire management concern to forest managers. To address this knowledge gap, we stacked logs to create ‘mega-log’ burning conditions and compared the temperature, duration and penetration of...
Author(s): Jane E. Smith, Ariel D. Cowan, Stephen A. Fitzgerald
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Severe wildfires create pulses of dead trees that influence future fuel loads, fire behavior, and fire effects as they decay and deposit surface woody fuels. Harvesting fire-killed trees may reduce future surface woody fuels and related fire hazards, but the magnitude and timing of post-fire logging effects on woody fuels have not...
Author(s): David W. Peterson, Erich K. Dodson, Richy J. Harrod
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).