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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

258 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

In sagebrush-dominated shrublands of western North America, warmer temperatures coupled with annual grass invasions are increasing the frequency and extent of wildfires. Postfire sagebrush recovery rates are unpredictable and many recent fires have resulted in the apparent loss of sagebrush habitat, resulting in a pressing need to...
Author(s): Alexandra K. Urza, Peter J. Weisberg, Jeanne C. Chambers, Stanley G. Kitchen, Bruce A. Roundy
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
After wildfire, hillslope and channel erosion produce large amounts of sediment and can contribute significantly to long‐term erosion rates. However, pre‐erosion high‐resolution topographic data (e.g. lidar) is often not available and determining specific contributions from post‐fire hillslope and channel erosion is challenging. The...
Author(s): Nicholas G. Ellett, Jennifer L. Pierce, Nancy F. Glenn
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires are natural disturbances in the western United States. Managing the resulting stands of dead and dying trees requires balancing conflicting priorities. Although these trees provide wildlife habitat and salvage logging revenue, they also pose public safety hazards. One criticism of salvage logging is that forest managers...
Author(s): Sharon M. Hood, Sheri L. Smith, Renate Bush, Maurice Huynh
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Although fire is an intrinsic factor in most terrestrial biomes, it is often perceived as a negative disturbance that must be suppressed. The application of successful fire prevention policies can lead to unsustainable fire events for ecosystems adapted to a specific fire regime. In addition, new climate and land use scenarios are...
Author(s): Daniel Moya, Giacomo Certini, Peter Z. Fule
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Following high-severity wildfire, application of mulch on the soil surface is commonly used to stabilize slopes and limit soil erosion potential, protecting ecosystem values at risk. Despite the widespread use of mulch, relatively little is known about its effects on ecosystem recovery and soil processes important for plant re-...
Author(s): Jayne L. Jonas, Erin Berryman, Brett Wolk, Penelope Morgan, Peter R. Robichaud
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The increasing frequency and severity of fire and drought events have negatively impacted the capacity and success of reforestation efforts in many dry, western U.S. forests. Challenges to reforestation include the cost and safety concerns of replanting large areas of standing dead trees, and high seedling and sapling mortality...
Author(s): Malcolm P. North, Jens T. Stevens, David F. Greene, Michelle Coppoletta, Eric E. Knapp, Andrew Latimer, Christina M. Restaino, Ryan Tompkins, Kevin R. Welch, Robert A. York, Derek J. N. Young, Jodi Axelson, Thomas N. Buckley, Becky L. Estes, Rachel N. Hager, Jonathan Long, Marc D. Meyer, Steven M. Ostoja, Hugh Safford, Kristen L. Shive, Carmen L. Tubbesing, Heather Vice, Dana Walsh, Chhaya M. Werner, Peter Wyrsch
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Natural resource managers sow grass, forb, and shrub seeds across millions of hectares of public lands in the western United States to restore sagebrush‐steppe ecosystems burned by wildfire. The effects of post‐fire vegetation treatments on insect communities in these ecosystems have not been investigated. We conducted the first...
Author(s): Ashley T. Rohde, David S. Pilliod, Stephen J. Novak
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mosses and wildfires are ubiquitous occurrences. Their correlation has been assessed in few studies. Mosses have been pointed as pioneer species in post-fire environments. However, reasons for moss crusting in post-wildfire soils and their ecosystem role in preventing soil erosion have not been quantitatively assessed. Moss crusts...
Author(s): Flávio C. Silva, Diana C.S. Vieira, Els van der Spek, J. Jacob Keizer
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
As more of the western US burns in large wildfires it is critical to managers and scientists to understand how these landscapes recovery post-fire. Tree regeneration in high severity burned landscapes determines if and how these landscapes become forested again, while changes in fuels structure influences how these landscapes may...
Author(s): Penelope Morgan, Camille Stevens-Rumann, Kerry Kemp, Jarod Blades
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The destructive nature of debris flows makes it difficult to quantify flow dynamics with direct instrumentation. For this reason, seismic sensors placed safely away from the flow path are often used to identify the timing and speed of debris flows. While seismic sensors have proven to be a valuable tool for event detection and early...
Author(s): A. Michel, Jason W. Kean, Joel B. Smith, Kate E. Allstadt, Jeffrey A. Coe
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).