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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are nearly 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

201 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Wildfires are natural disturbances in the western United States. Managing the resulting stands of dead and dying trees requires balancing conflicting priorities. Although these trees provide wildlife habitat and salvage logging revenue, they also pose public safety hazards. One criticism of salvage logging is that forest managers...
Author(s): Sharon M. Hood, Sheri L. Smith, Renate Bush, Maurice Huynh
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
During 2-5 December 2010, an area of 2500 ha in the Carmel forests was consumed by a severe wildfire, causing soil erosion from the exposed slopes. Whereas most studies show that post-fire erosion rates tend to decline after the second year, in this case, we aim to address the ongoing consequences that different management practices...
Author(s): Rami Zituni, Lea Wittenberg, Dan Malkinson
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The increasing frequency and severity of fire and drought events have negatively impacted the capacity and success of reforestation efforts in many dry, western U.S. forests. Challenges to reforestation include the cost and safety concerns of replanting large areas of standing dead trees, and high seedling and sapling mortality...
Author(s): Malcolm P. North, Jens T. Stevens, David F. Greene, Michelle Coppoletta, Eric E. Knapp, Andrew Latimer, Christina M. Restaino, Ryan Tompkins, Kevin R. Welch, Robert A. York, Derek J. N. Young, Jodi Axelson, Thomas N. Buckley, Becky L. Estes, Rachel N. Hager, Jonathan Long, Marc D. Meyer, Steven M. Ostoja, Hugh Safford, Kristen L. Shive, Carmen L. Tubbesing, Heather Vice, Dana Walsh, Chhaya M. Werner, Peter Wyrsch
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Background: Wildfires, like many disturbances, can be catalysts for ecosystem change. Given projected climate change, tree regeneration declines and ecosystem shifts following severe wildfires are predicted. We reviewed scientific literature on post-fire tree regeneration to understand where and why no or few trees established. We...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increasing wildfires in western North American conifer forests have led to debates surrounding the application of post-fire management practices. There is a lack of consensus on whether (and to what extent) post-fire management assists or hinders managers in achieving goals, particularly in under-studied regions like eastern...
Author(s): Victoria M. Donovan, Caleb P. Roberts, Carissa L. Wonkka, David A. Wedin, Dirac Twidwell
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fires and floods are important drivers of geomorphic change. While the hydrologic and geomorphic effects of fires have been studied at the hillslope scale, we have much more limited data on post-fire runoff, channel changes, and inferred or measured sediment storage and delivery at larger scales. In this study we intensively...
Author(s): Dan Brogan, Lee H. MacDonald, Peter A. Nelson, Jacob A. Morgan
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Robust tree regeneration following high‐severity wildfire is key to the resilience of subalpine and boreal forests, and 21st century climate could initiate abrupt change in forests if postfire temperature and soil moisture become less suitable for tree seedling establishment. Using two widespread conifer species, lodgepole pine (...
Author(s): Winslow D. Hansen, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Humans live in or adjacent to wildland ecosystems that burn periodically and are part of nearly all ecosystems that are in the pyrosphere. There are many hazards posed by wildfire and certain consequences of living in these ecosystems. Most are associated with wildfire, but the increased use of prescribed fire is an issue because of...
Author(s): Daniel G. Neary, Jackson M. Leonard
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Seed mixes used for postfire seeding in the Great Basin are often selected on the basis of short-term rehabilitation objectives, such as ability to rapidly establish and suppress invasive exotic annuals (e.g., cheatgrass, Bromus tectorum L.). Longer-term considerations are also important, including whether seeded plants persist,...
Author(s): Jeffrey E. Ott, Francis F. Kilkenny, Daniel D. Summers, Tyler W. Thompson
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Soil compaction during post-fire logging can increase runoff and erosion. Increasing surface cover is an effective way to reduce erosion, but this has not been tested on soils impacted by both fire and compaction. We measured the effects of compaction (bulk density of 0.9 or 1.1 g cm−3) and surface cover (0% or 60%) using bark mulch...
Author(s): Sergio A. Prats, Maruxa C. Malvar, Celeste O.A. Coelho, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).