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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

150 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Setting suitable conservation targets is an important part of ecological fire planning. Growth-stage optimisation (GSO) determines the relative proportions of post-fire growth stages (categorical representations of time since fire) that maximise species diversity, and is a useful method for determining such targets. Optimisation...
Author(s): Matthew Swan, Holly Sitters, Jane G. Cawson, Thomas J. Duff, Yohannes Wibisono, Alan York
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The 2010 Church’s Park Fire burned beetle-killed lodgepole pine stands in Colorado, including recently salvage-logged areas, creating a fortuitous opportunity to compare the effects of salvage logging, wildfire and the combination of logging followed by wildfire. Here, we examine tree regeneration, surface fuels, understory plants,...
Author(s): Charles C. Rhoades, Kristen Pelz, Paula J. Fornwalt, Brett Wolk, Anthony S. Cheng
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Models based on functional traits have limited power in predicting how animal populations respond to disturbance because they do not capture the range of demographic and biological factors that drive population dynamics, including variation in trophic interactions. I tested the hypothesis that successional changes in vegetation...
Author(s): Annabel L. Smith
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
New fire disturbance regimes under accelerating global environmental change can have unprecedented consequences for ecosystem resilience, lessening ecosystem natural regeneration. In the Mediterranean Basin, firedependent obligate seeder forests that are prone to increasingly frequent stand-replacing fires and then salvaged logged...
Author(s): Angela Taboada, Víctor Fernández-García, Elena Marcos, Leonor Calvo
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire increases the likelihood of runoff, erosion, and downstream sedimentation in many of the watersheds that supply water for Colorado’s Front Range communities. The objectives of this study were to: (1) identify rainfall intensity thresholds for a post-fire runoff or sediment delivery response at plots (≤0.06 ha), hillslopes (...
Author(s): Codie Wilson, Stephanie Kampf, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner, Lee H. MacDonald
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest wildfires consume fuel and are followed by post-fire fuel accumulation. This study examines post-fire surface fuel dynamics over 9 years across a wide range of conditions characteristic of California fires in dry conifer and hardwood forests. We estimated post-fire surface fuel loadings (Mg ha−1) from 191 repeatedly measured...
Author(s): Bianca N. I. Eskelson, Vicente J. Monleon
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate change indirectly affects forest ecosystems through changes in the frequency, size, and/or severity of wildfires. In addition to its direct effects prior to fire, climate also influences immediate postfire recruitment, with consequences for future vegetation structure and fire activity. A major uncertainty, therefore, is if...
Author(s): Kimberley T. Davis, Philip E. Higuera, Anna Sala
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires are increasing in size and severity in forested landscapes across the Western United States. Not only do fires alter land surfaces, but they also affect the surface water quality in downstream systems. Previous studies of individual fires have observed an increase in various forms of nutrients, ions, sediments and metals...
Author(s): Ashley J. Rust, Terri S. Hogue, Samuel Saxe, John McCray
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Continued growth of the human population on Earth will increase pressure on already stressed terrestrial water resources required for drinking water, agriculture, and industry. This stress demands improved understanding of critical controls on water resource availability, particularly in water-limited regions. Mechanistic...
Author(s): Michael L. Wine, Daniel Cadol, Oleg Makhnin
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The biogeochemical and stoichiometric signature of vegetation fire may influence post-fire ecosystem characteristics and the evolution of plant ‘fire traits’. Phosphorus (P), a potentially limiting nutrient in many fire-prone environments, might be particularly important in this context; however, the effects of fire on P cycling...
Author(s): Orpheus M. Butler, James J. Elser, Tom Lewis, Brendan Mackey, Chengrong Chen
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).