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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

245 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

The loading of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from soils to inland waters and ultimate transport to the ocean is a critical flux pathway in the terrestrial biosphere carbon cycle. Fires can significantly affect this flux through biogeochemical processes related to oxidation and mobilization of DOC in the soil. Therefore, in order to...
Author(s): Xinyuan Wei, Daniel J. Hayes, Ivan Fernandez
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Active wildfire seasons in the western U.S. warrant the evaluation of post‐fire forest management strategies. Ground‐based salvage logging is often used to recover economic loss of burned timber. In unburned forests, ground‐based logging often follows best management practices by leaving undisturbed areas near streams called stream...
Author(s): Peter R. Robichaud, Edwin D. Bone, Sarah A. Lewis, Erin S. Brooks, Robert E. Brown
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Postfire shifts in vegetation composition will have broad ecological impacts. However, information characterizing postfire recovery patterns and their drivers are lacking over large spatial extents. In this analysis, we used Landsat imagery collected when snow cover (SCS) was present, in combination with growing season (GS) imagery...
Author(s): Melanie K. Vanderhoof, Todd J. Hawbaker, Andrea Ku, Kyle E. Merriam, Erin Berryman, Megan E. Cattau
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The unprecedented scale of the 2019-2020 eastern Australian bushfires exemplifies the challenges that scientists and conservation biologists face monitoring the effects on biodiversity in the aftermath of large-scale environmental disturbances. After a large-scale disturbance, conservation policy and management actions need to be...
Author(s): Casey Kirchhoff, Corey T. Callaghan, David A. Keith, Dony Indiarto, Guy Taseski, Mark K. J. Ooi, Tom D. Le Breton, Thomas Mesaglio, Richard T. Kingsford, William K. Cornwell
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Hillslope erosion has often been monitored with sediment fences, but these can underestimate sediment yields due to overtopping of runoff and associated sediment. We modified four sediment fences to collect and measure the runoff and sediment that overtopped the fence in addition to the sediment deposited behind the fence. Specific...
Author(s): Codie Wilson, Stephanie Kampf, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner, Lee H. MacDonald, Hunter Gleason
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the near future, a higher occurrence of wildfires is expected due to climate change, carrying social, environmental, and economic implications. Such impacts are often associated with an increase of post‐fire hydrological and erosive responses, which are difficult to predict. Soil erosion models have been proven to be a valuable...
Author(s): Ana Rita Lopes, Antonio Girona-García, Sofia Corticeiro, Ricardo Martins, Jan J. Keizer
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
We appreciate Hutto’s call to promote positive ecological outcomes by recognizing diverse forest fire ecologies. Nevertheless, we continue to argue that restoration treatments are appropriate in the approximately 17 million ha of forest in the western US that historically burned every 40 years or less (Rollins 2009). Given ongoing...
Author(s): Scott L. Stephens, Anthony L. Westerling, Matthew D. Hurteau, M. Zachariah Perry, Courtney Schultz, Sally Thompson
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increased demand for timber, the reduction in the available timber resources, and more frequent and severe forest fires under a changing climate have increased the use of salvage logging in North American forests despite concerns regarding impacts on biodiversity and long-term forest productivity. We aimed to complement previous...
Author(s): Fidèle Bognounou, Lisa A. Venier, Steven L. Van Wilgenburg, Isabelle Aubin, Jean-Noel Candau, Andre Arsenault, Christian Hebert, Jacques Ibarzabal, Samantha J. Song, Louis De Grandpré
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Following a wildfire, regeneration to forest can take decades to centuries and is no longer assured in many western U.S. environments given escalating wildfire severity and warming trends. After large fire years, managers prioritize where to allocate scarce planting resources, often with limited information on the factors that drive...
Author(s): Nicholas A. Povak, Derek J. Churchill, C. Alina Cansler, Paul F. Hessburg, Van R. Kane, Jonathan T. Kane, James A. Lutz, Andrew J. Larson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Destructive flash floods and debris flows are a common menace following wildfire. The restoration of protection provided by forests from post-fire floods and debris flows depends on the recovery of infiltration and attendant reduction of infiltration-excess surface runoff generation. This work examines seven years of post-fire...
Author(s): Brian A. Ebel
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).