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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are nearly 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

4323 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

This review is focused on tree seedling regeneration for several reasons. First, a high mortality event, like a high- severity wildfire, kills the mature trees needed to maintain forest cover. When fire-caused mortality is minimal, we are less concerned about tree regeneration, but a high severity fire creates the need for tree...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Penelope Morgan, Kimberley T. Davis, Kerry Kemp, Jarod Blades
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Synthesis
Aim: Over the past several decades, wildfires have become larger, more frequent, and/or more severe in many areas. Simultaneously, anthropogenic ignitions are steadily growing. We have little understanding of how increasing anthropogenic ignitions are changing modern fire regimes. Location: Conterminous United States. Time period...
Author(s): Megan E. Cattau, Carol A. Wessman, Adam L. Mahood, Jennifer Balch
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the southern hemisphere summer of 2019–20, Australia experienced its most severe bushfire season on record. Smoke from fires affected 80% of the population, with large and prolonged exceedances of the Australian National Air Quality Standard for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) recorded in all major population centers. We examined...
Author(s): Sharon L. Campbell, Penelope J. Jones, Grant J. Williamson, Amanda J. Wheeler, Christopher Lucani, David M. J. S. Bowman, Fay H. Johnston
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Background: Wildfire events are increasing in prevalence in the western United States. Research has found mixed results on the degree to which exposure to wildfire smoke is associated with an increased risk of mortality. Methods: We tested for an association between exposure to wildfire smoke and non-traumatic mortality in...
Author(s): Annie Doubleday, Jill Schulte, Lianne Sheppard, Matthew C. Kadlec, Ranil Dhammapala, Julie Fox, Tania M. Busch Isaksen
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Social acceptability of environmental management actions, such as prescribed burning used to reduce wildfire risk, is critical to achieving positive outcomes. However, environmental managers often need to implement strategies over a long time period, and sustaining long-term community support can be challenging. Public attention to...
Author(s): Melinda R. Mylek, Jacki Schirmer
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Evacuation is the preferred method in the U.S. for preserving public safety in wildfire. However, alternatives such as staying and defending are used both in North America and Australia. Dangerous delays in the decision to evacuate are also common. One contributor to the evacuation decision is attachment to the home, however, little...
Author(s): Hugh D. Walpole, Robyn S. Wilson, Sarah M. McCaffrey
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Particularly in rural settings, there has been little research regarding the health impacts of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during the wildfire season smoke exposure period on respiratory diseases, such as influenza, and their associated outbreaks months later. We examined the delayed effects of PM2.5 concentrations for the short...
Author(s): Erin L. Landguth, Zachary A. Holden, Jonathan M. Graham, Benjamin Stark, Elham Bayat Mokhtari, Emily Kaleczyc, Stacey Anderson, Shawn P. Urbanski, William Matt Jolly, Erin O. Semmens, Dyer A. Warren, Alan Swanson, Emily Stone, Curtis W. Noonan
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Land treatments in wildland-urban interface (WUI) areas are highly visible and subject to public scrutiny and possible opposition. This study examines a contested vegetation treatment-Forsythe II-in a WUI area of the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest in Colorado. An initial phase of the research found vocal opposition to Forsythe II...
Author(s): Hannah Brenkert-Smith, Jody L. Jahn, Eric A. Vance, Juan Ahumada
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive luminescence signal of archaeological ceramics and tree-ring fire histories to show that...
Author(s): Christopher I. Roos, T. M. Rittenour, Thomas W. Swetnam, Rachel A. Loehman, Kacy L. Hollenback, Matthew J. Liebmann, Dana Drake Rosenstein
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Many large fires have burned in recent decades across western North America, and this trend is projected to continue as conditions become warmer and drier. Recovery processes have been studied more thoroughly 1-2 years post fire than in the longer term. Fuel and fire managers need better information on long-term post-fire ecosystem...
Author(s): Andrew T. Hudak, Leda N. Kobziar, Karen L. Riley
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).