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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

940 results

Fuel treatments in riparian areas pose distinct challenges. Riparian areas are protected by administrative regulations, many of which are largely custodial and restrict active management. However, riparian areas have also been affected by fire suppression, land use, and disturbance and manipulative treatments of fuels...
Author(s): Kathleen A. Dwire, Kristen E. Meyer, Sandra E. Ryan, Gregg M. Riegel, Timothy A. Burton
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
Wildfire is a key factor influencing bird community composition in western North American forests. We need to understand species and community responses to wildfire and how responses vary regionally to effectively manage dry conifer forests for maintaining biodiversity. We compared avian relationships with wildfire burn severity...
Author(s): Quresh Latif, Jamie Sanderlin, Victoria A. Saab, William M. Block, Jonathan G. Dudley
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increasing rates of natural disturbances under a warming climate raise important questions about how multiple disturbances interact. Escalating wildfire activity in recent decades has resulted in some forests re-burning in short succession, but how the severity of one wildfire affects that of a subsequent wildfire is not fully...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest ecosystems can act as sinks of carbon and thus mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions. When forests are actively managed, treatments can alter forests carbon dynamics, reducing their sink strength and switching them from sinks to sources of carbon. These effects are generally characterized by fast temporal dynamics. Hence...
Author(s): Sabina Dore, Danny L. Fry, Brandon M. Collins, Rodrigo Vargas, Robert A. York, Scott L. Stephens
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Insect outbreaks are major disturbances that affect a land area similar to that of forest fires across North America. The recent mountain pine bark beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak and its associated blue stain fungi (Grosmannia clavigera) are impacting water partitioning processes of forests in the Rocky Mountain region as...
Author(s): David E. Reed, Brent E. Ewers, Elise G. Pendall, John M. Frank, Robert Kelly
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
As large, high-severity forest fires increase and snowpacks become more vulnerable to climate change across the western USA, it is important to understand post-fire disturbance impacts on snow hydrology. Here, we examine, quantify, parameterize, model, and assess the post-fire radiative forcing effects on snow to improve hydrologic...
Author(s): Kelly E. Gleason, Anne W. Nolin
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
There is a widespread view among land managers and others that the protected status of many forestlands in the western United States corresponds with higher fire severity levels due to historical restrictions on logging that contribute to greater amounts of biomass and fuel loading in less intensively managed areas, particularly...
Author(s): Curtis M. Bradley, Chad T. Hanson, Dominick A. DellaSala
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Quantifying the linkages between vegetation disturbance by fire and the changes in hydrologic processes leading to post-fire erosional response remains a challenge. We measured the influence of fire severity, defined as vegetation disturbance (using a satellite-derived vegetation disturbance index, VDI), landscape features that...
Author(s): Kevin D. Hyde, Kelsey Jencso, Andrew C. Wilcox, Scott W. Woods
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The prevailing paradigm in the western U.S. is that the increase in stand-replacing wildfires in historically frequent-fire dry forests is due to unnatural fuel loads that have resulted from management activities including fire suppression, logging, and grazing, combined with more severe drought conditions and increasing...
Author(s): Elizabeth L. Kalies, Larissa L. Yocom Kent
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Forests that historically burned in mixed-severity fire regimes prove difficult to manage, especially when they border homes and prized recreation areas. This management challenge was the focus of the Fuels Reduction and Restoration in Mixed-Conifer Forests of the Southwestern Crown of the Continent field trip, following the May...
Author(s): Corey L. Gucker
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).