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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

690 results

Extensive outbreaks of bark beetles have killed trees across millions of hectares of forests and woodlands in western North America. These outbreaks have led to spirited scientific, public, and policy debates about consequential increases in fire risk, especially in the wildland–urban interface (WUI), where homes and communities are...
Author(s): Dominik Kulakowski, Nathan Mietkiewicz
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
As large, high-severity forest fires increase and snowpacks become more vulnerable to climate change across the western USA, it is important to understand post-fire disturbance impacts on snow hydrology. Here, we examine, quantify, parameterize, model, and assess the post-fire radiative forcing effects on snow to improve hydrologic...
Author(s): Kelly E. Gleason, Anne W. Nolin
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding the rates, trajectories, and spatial variability in succession following severe wildfire is increasingly important for forest managers in western North America and critical for anticipating the resilience or vulnerability of forested landscapes to changing environmental conditions. However, few long-term...
Author(s): Monica G. Turner, William H. Romme, Daniel B. Tinker, Daniel C. Donato, Brian J. Harvey
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Recent large and severe outbreaks of native bark beetles have raised concern among the general public and land managers about potential for amplified fire activity in western North America. To date, the majority of studies examining bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire severity in the U.S. Rocky Mountains have focused on...
Author(s): Robert A. Andrus, Thomas T. Veblen, Brian J. Harvey, Sarah Hart
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest fires fundamentally shape the habitats available for wildlife. Current predictions for fire under a warming climate suggest larger and more severe fires may occur, thus challenging scientists and managers to understand and predict impacts of fire on focal species, especially species of management concern. Snowshoe hares (...
Author(s): Ellen Cheng, Karen E. Hodges, Scott Mills
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The risk of bark beetle outbreaks is widely predicted to increase because of a warming climate that accelerates temperature-driven beetle population growth and drought stress that impairs host tree defenses. However, few if any studies have explicitly evaluated climatically enhanced beetle population dynamics in relation to climate-...
Author(s): Christian Temperli, Thomas T. Veblen, Sarah Hart, Dominik Kulakowski, Alan J. Tepley
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Ecological niche models predict plant responses to climate change by circumscribing species distributions within a multivariate environmental framework. Most projections based on modern bioclimatic correlations imply that high-elevation species are likely to be extirpated from their current ranges as a result of rising growing-...
Author(s): Virginia Iglesias, Teresa R. Krause, Cathy L. Whitlock
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Patches of live, dead, and dying trees resulting from bark beetle-caused mortality alter spatial and temporal variability in the canopy and surface fuel complex through changes in the foliar moisture content of attacked trees and through the redistribution of canopy fuels. The resulting heterogeneous fuels complexes alter within-...
Author(s): Chad M. Hoffman, Rodman Linn, Russell A. Parsons, Carolyn Hull Sieg, Judith Winterkamp
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate science and understanding how climate change may affect the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) have come a long way since our 1992 Yellowstone Science article (Romme and Turner 1992, based on Romme and Turner 1991). In 1992, the potential for global warming driven by anthropogenic emissions of...
Author(s): William H. Romme, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The implementation of US federal forest restoration programs on national forests is a complex process that requires balancing diverse socioecological goals with project economics. Despite both the large geographic scope and substantial investments in restoration projects, a quantitative decision support framework to locate optimal...
Author(s): Kevin C. Vogler, Alan A. Ager, Michelle A. Day, Michael Jennings, John D. Bailey
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).