Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

 

Contact  |  FireScience.gov  JFSP program icon

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

690 results

Like many fire-adapted ecosystems, decades of fire exclusion policy in the Rocky Mountains and Foothills natural regions of southern Alberta, Canada are raising concern over the loss of ecological integrity. Departure from historical conditions is evaluated using median fire return intervals (MdFRI) based on fire history data from...
Author(s): Michael D. Flannigan, Brad C. Hawkes, Marc-Andre Parisien, Marie-Pierre Rogeau, Rick Arthur
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In 1988, fires burned 36% (about 800,000 acres) of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). At the time, the size and severity of these fires was greater than scientists and land managers were used to and they were attributed to excessive fuel loadings that were a result of past fire suppression. However, fire history and fire ecology...
Author(s): Corey L. Gucker
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Young, recently burned forests are increasingly widespread throughout western North America, but forest development after large wildfires is not fully understood, especially regarding effects of variable burn severity, environmental heterogeneity, and changes in drivers over time. We followed development of subalpine forests after...
Author(s): William H. Romme, Timothy G. Whitby, Daniel B. Tinker, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This reference presents general guidelines for planning, implementing, and evaluating whitebark pine conservation and management activities on lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management.
Author(s): Dana L. Perkins, Robert E. Means, Alexia C. Cochrane
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
The 2000 Valley Complex wildfire burned in steep montane forests with ash cap soils in western Montana, USA. The effects of high soil burn severity on forest soil hydrologic function were examined using rainfall simulations (100mmh-1 for 1 h) on 0.5-m2 plots. Infiltration rates, sediment yields and sediment concentrations were...
Author(s): Peter R. Robichaud, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner, Frederick B. Pierson, Kenneth E. Spaeth, Louise E. Ashmun, Corey A. Moffet
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The persistence of ponderosa pine and lodgepole pine forests in the 21st century depends to a large extent on how seedling emergence and establishment are influenced by driving climate and environmental variables, which largely govern forest regeneration. We surveyed the literature, and identified 96 publications that reported data...
Author(s): M. D. Petrie, A. M. Wildeman, John Bradford, Robert M. Hubbard, William Lauenroth
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Disturbance and succession have long been of interest in ecology, but how landscape patterns of ecosystem structure and function evolve following large disturbances is poorly understood. After nearly 25 years, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) forests that regenerated after the 1988 Yellowstone Fires (Wyoming, USA)...
Author(s): Monica G. Turner, Timothy G. Whitby, Daniel B. Tinker, William H. Romme
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Escalating wildfire in subalpine forests with stand-replacing fire regimes is increasing the extent of early-seral forests throughout the western USA. Post-fire succession generates the fuel for future fires, but little is known about fuel loads and their variability in young post-fire stands. We sampled fuel profiles in 24-year-old...
Author(s): Kellen N. Nelson, Monica G. Turner, William H. Romme, Daniel B. Tinker
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The prevailing paradigm in the western U.S. is that the increase in stand-replacing wildfires in historically frequent-fire dry forests is due to unnatural fuel loads that have resulted from management activities including fire suppression, logging, and grazing, combined with more severe drought conditions and increasing...
Author(s): Elizabeth L. Kalies, Larissa L. Yocom Kent
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Wildfires shape the distribution and structure of vegetation across the inland northwestern United States. However, fire activity is expected to increase given the current rate of climate change, with uncertain outcomes. A fire impact that has not been widely addressed is the development of unburned islands; areas within the fire...
Author(s): Arjan J. H. Meddens, Crystal A. Kolden, James A. Lutz
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).