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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

504 results

Mick Harrington and Steve Arno, retired research foresters with the USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station, took participants of the May 2014 Large Wildland Fires Conference through a 300-year-old stand of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and western larch (Larix occidentalis). While there, they discussed their research, which...
Author(s): Corey L. Gucker
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Over the past several decades, size and extent of wildfires have been increasing in the western United States (Westerling et al. 2006; Littell et al. 2009). As the number and size of recent wildfires increases across landscapes, fire managers are questioning how past wildfires may influence the spread and effects of subsequent...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Susan J. Prichard, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Synthesis
Wildfire in western U.S. federally managed forests has increased substantially in recent decades, with large (>1000 acre) fires in the decade through 2012 over five times as frequent (450 percent increase) and burned area over ten times as great (930 percent increase) as the 1970s and early 1980s. These changes are closely linked...
Author(s): Anthony L. Westerling, Timothy J. Brown, Tania L. Schoennagel, Thomas W. Swetnam, Monica G. Turner, Thomas T. Veblen
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
A series of environmental changes from late-glacial ice recession through the early Holocene are revealed in a 7000-yr-long record of pollen, charcoal, geochemistry, and stable isotopes from Blacktail Pond, a closed-basin lake in Yellowstone National Park. Prior to 11,500 cal yr BP, cool conditions dominated, fire activity was low,...
Author(s): Teresa R. Krause, Cathy L. Whitlock
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Because of their close relationships with fires, western forest ecosystems are considered fire dependent. If we hope to sustain the communities of trees, plants, and animals that characterize these wildland forests, we need to understand the natural role of fire, changes brought about by suppressing fire, and alternatives for...
Author(s): Diane M. Smith
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Until recently, most contemporary ecologists have ignored or diminished anecdotal historical accounts and anthropologists' reports about aboriginal fire in the Great Basin. Literature review shows that Indians practiced regular use of fire for many purposes, including the obvious reasons of increasing the availability of desired...
Author(s): Kent J. McAdoo, Brad W. Schultz, Sherman R. Swanson
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is the most widespread tree species in North America, and it is found throughout much of the Mountain West (MW) across a broad range of bioclimatic regions. Aspen typically regenerates asexually and prolifically after fire, and due to its seral status in many western conifer forests, aspen...
Author(s): Douglas J. Shinneman, William L. Baker, Paul C. Rogers, Dominik Kulakowski
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In many U.S. federally designated wilderness areas, wildfires are likely to burn of their own accord due to favorable management policies and remote location. Previous research suggested that limitations on fire size can result from the evolution of natural fire regimes, specifically in places where fuels were...
Author(s): Sandra L. Haire, Kevin McGarigal, Carol Miller
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) is in serious decline across its range, largely due to the combined effects of Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisch (an introduced fungal pathogen that causes white pine blister rust), replacement by late successional species, and widespread infestation of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus...
Author(s): Lauren Fins, Ben Hoppus
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Sagebrush landscapes provide habitat for Sage-Grouse and other sagebrush obligates, yet historical fire regimes and the structure of historical sagebrush landscapes are poorly known, hampering ecological restoration and management. To remedy this, General Land Office Survey (GLO) survey notes were used to reconstruct over two...
Author(s): Beth E. Bukowski, William L. Baker
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).