Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

 

Contact  |  FireScience.gov  JFSP program icon

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

1307 results

Ash plays an important role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire and has frequently been hypothesised to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Yet evidence for clogging is incomplete, as research has focussed on identifying the presence of ash in soil; the actual flow processes remain unknown. We conducted...
Author(s): Cathelijine Stoof, Anouk I. Gevaert, Christine Baver, Bahareh Hassanpour, Veronica L. Morales, Wei Zhang, Deborah A. Martin, Shree K. Giri, Tammo S. Steenhuis
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
With longer and more severe fire seasons predicted, the incidence and extent of fires are expected to increase in western North America. As more area is burned, past wildfires may influence the spread and burn severity of subsequent fires, with implications for ecosystem resilience and fire management. We examined how previous burn...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Susan J. Prichard, Eva K. Strand, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Non-deforestation fire – i.e., fire that is typically followed by the recovery of natural vegetation – is arguably the most influential disturbance in terrestrial ecosystems, thereby playing a major role in carbon exchanges and affecting many climatic processes. The radiative effect from a given atmospheric CO2 perturbation is the...
Author(s): Jean-Sebastien Landry, H. Damon Matthews
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The response of 28 shrub species to wildfire burn severity was assessed for 8 wildfires on 6 national forests in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. Stratified random sampling was used to choose 224 stands based on burn severity, habitat type series, slope steepness, stand height, and stand density, which resulted in 896 plots...
Author(s): Dennis E. Ferguson, John C. Byrne
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
We conducted bird surveys in 10 of the first 11 years following a mixed-severity fire in a dry, low-elevation mixed-conifer forest in western Montana, United States. By defining fire in terms of fire severity and time-since-fire, and then comparing detection rates for species inside 15 combinations of fire severity and time-since-...
Author(s): Richard L. Hutto, David A. Patterson
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire regime characteristics in North America are expected to change over the next several decades as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Although some fire regime characteristics (e.g., area burned and fire season length) are relatively well-studied in the context of a changing climate, fire severity has received less...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Carol Miller, John T. Abatzoglou, Lisa M. Holsinger, Marc-Andre Parisien, Solomon Z. Dobrowski
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Most models project warmer and drier climates that will contribute to larger and more frequent wildfires. However, it remains unknown how repeated wildfires alter post-fire successional patterns and forest structure. Here, we test the hypothesis that the number of wildfires, as well as the order and severity of wildfire events...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Resilience in fire-prone forests is strongly affected by landscape burn-severity patterns, in part by governing propagule availability around stand-replacing patches in which all or most vegetation is killed. However, little is known about drivers of landscape patterns of stand-replacing fire, or whether...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Young, recently burned forests are increasingly widespread throughout western North America, but forest development after large wildfires is not fully understood, especially regarding effects of variable burn severity, environmental heterogeneity, and changes in drivers over time. We followed development of subalpine forests after...
Author(s): William H. Romme, Timothy G. Whitby, Daniel B. Tinker, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Total post-fire tree seedling establishment (all species combined) declined sharply with greater post-fire drought severity and with greater distance to seed sources (i.e. the interior of burn patches). Effects varied among key species groups. For conifers that dominate present-day subalpine forests (Picea engelmannii...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).