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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

1307 results

The biogeochemical and stoichiometric signature of vegetation fire may influence post-fire ecosystem characteristics and the evolution of plant ‘fire traits’. Phosphorus (P), a potentially limiting nutrient in many fire-prone environments, might be particularly important in this context; however, the effects of fire on P cycling...
Author(s): Orpheus M. Butler, James J. Elser, Tom Lewis, Brendan Mackey, Chengrong Chen
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Biomass burning is an important source to the atmosphere of carbonaceous particulate matter that impacts air quality, climate, and human health. The semivolatile nature of directlyemitted organic particulate matter can result in particle evaporation as smoke plumes dilute. Further, oxidation of emitted and volatilized precursors can...
Author(s): Sonia M. Kreidenweis, Jeffrey R. Pierce
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wildfires emit significant amounts of pollutants that degrade air quality. Plumes from three wildfires in the western U.S. were measured from aircraft during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) and the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP), both in...
Author(s): Xiaoxi Liu, L. Gregory Huey, Robert J. Yokelson, Vanessa Selimovic, Isobel J. Simpson, Markus Muller, Jose L. Jimenez, Pedro Campuzano-Jost, Andreas J. Beyersdorf, Donald R. Blake, Zachary Butterfield, Yonghoon Choi, John D. Crounse, Douglas A. Day, Glenn S. Diskin, Manvendra K. Dubey, Edward Fortner, Thomas F. Hanisco, Weiwei Hu, Laura E. King, Lawrence Kleinman, Simone Meinardi, Tomas Mikoviny, Timothy B. Onasch, Brett B. Palm, Jeff Peischl, Ilana B. Pollack, Thomas B. Ryerson, Glen W. Sachse, Arthur J. Sedlacek, John E. Shilling, Stephen Springston, Jason M. St. Clair, David J. Tanner, Alexander P. Teng, Paul O. Wennberg, Armin Wisthaler, Glenn M. Wolfe
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate change is projected to exacerbate the intensity of heat waves and drought, leading to a greater incidence of large and high-intensity wildfires in forested ecosystems. Predicting responses of seedlings to such fires requires a process-based understanding of how the energy released during fires affects plant physiology and...
Author(s): Alistair M. S. Smith, Alan F. Talhelm, Daniel M. Johnson, Aaron M. Sparks, Crystal A. Kolden, Kara M. Yedinak, Kent G. Apostol, Wade T. Tinkham, John T. Abatzoglou, James A. Lutz, Anthony S. Davis, Kurt S. Pregitzer, Henry D. Adams, Robert L. Kremens
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Prescribed fire is widely applied in western US forests to limit future fire severity by reducing tree density, fuels, and excessive seedlings. Repeated prescribed burning attempts to simulate historical fire regimes in frequent-fire forests, yet there is limited long-term information regarding optimal burn season and frequency. In...
Author(s): Douglas J. Westlind, Becky K. Kerns
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Summary: 1) Increased incidence of landscape fire and pollinator declines with co-extinctions of dependent plant species are both globally significant. Fire can alter species distributions, but its effects on plant–pollinator interactions are poorly understood so its present and future role in coupled plant-pollinator declines...
Author(s): Julian Brown, Alan York, Fiona J. Christie, Michael A. McCarthy
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire is a driving force in the North American landscape and predicting post-fire tree mortality is vital to land management. Post-fire tree mortality can have substantial economic and social impacts, and natural resource managers need reliable predictive methods to anticipate potential mortality following fire events. Current fire...
Author(s): Lindsay M. Grayson, Robert A. Progar, Sharon M. Hood
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Nearly half of the area occupied by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems before European-American settlement has been lost due to conversion to other land cover types, and agriculture, urbanization, and industrial development. Thus, conservation and proper management of these ecosystems has been a priority, especially following the...
Author(s): Robin J. Innes
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Interest in PNW forests is shifting from a focus on old-growth forests alone to include the ecological value and processes of early-seral communities. However, focusing on the alpha and omega states of a linear successional model does not account for the suite of conditions derived from mixed-severity fire common in many forests....
Author(s): Christopher J. Dunn, John D. Bailey
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The area burned annually by wildfires is expected to increase worldwide due to climate change. Burned areas increase soil erosion rates within watersheds, which can increase sedimentation in downstream rivers and reservoirs. However, which watersheds will be impacted by future wildfires is largely unknown. Using an ensemble of...
Author(s): Joel B. Sankey, Jason Kreitler, Todd J. Hawbaker, Jason L. McVay, Mary Ellen Miller, Erich R. Mueller, Nicole M. Vaillant, Scott E. Lowe, Temuulen T. Sankey
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).