Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

 

Contact  |  FireScience.gov  JFSP program icon

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

890 results

Extensive mortality of whitebark pine, beginning in the early to mid-2000s, occurred in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) of the western US, primarily from mountain pine beetle but also from other threats such as white pine blister rust. The climatic drivers of this recent mortality and the potential for future whitebark pine...
Author(s): Polly C. Buotte, Jeffrey A. Hicke, Haiganoush K. Preisler, John T. Abatzoglou, Kenneth F. Raffa, Jesse A. Logan
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Future forests are being shaped by changing climate and disturbances. Climate change is causing large-scale forest declines globally, in addition to distributional shifts of many tree species. Because environmental cues dictate insect seasonality and population success, climate change is also influencing tree-killing bark beetles....
Author(s): Barbara J. Bentz, Jacob P. Duncan, James A. Powell
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding the causes and consequences of rapid environmental change is an essential scientific frontier, particularly given the threat of climate- and land use-induced changes in disturbance regimes. In western North America, recent widespread insect outbreaks and wildfires have sparked acute concerns about potential insect–fire...
Author(s): Garrett W. Meigs, Harold S. Zald, John L. Campbell, William S. Keeton, Robert E. Kennedy
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest ecosystems can act as sinks of carbon and thus mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions. When forests are actively managed, treatments can alter forests carbon dynamics, reducing their sink strength and switching them from sinks to sources of carbon. These effects are generally characterized by fast temporal dynamics. Hence...
Author(s): Sabina Dore, Danny L. Fry, Brandon M. Collins, Rodrigo Vargas, Robert A. York, Scott L. Stephens
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This report provides a strategic approach developed by a Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies interagency working group for conservation of sagebrush ecosystems, Greater sage-grouse, and Gunnison sage-grouse. It uses information on (1) factors that influence sagebrush ecosystem resilience to disturbance and resistance...
Author(s): Jeanne C. Chambers, Jeffrey L. Beck, Steven B. Campbell, John Carlson, Thomas J. Christiansen, Karen J. Clause, Jonathan B. Dinkins, Douglas W. Havlina, Kevin E. Doherty, Kathleen A. Griffin, Douglas W. Havlina, Kenneth F. Henke, Jacob D. Hennig, Laurie L. Kurth, Jeremy D. Maestas, Mary Manning, Kenneth E. Mayer, Brian A. Mealor, Clinton McCarthy, Marco A. Perea, David A. Pyke
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Current phylogenetic evidence shows that fire began shaping the evolution of land plants 125 Ma, although the fossil charcoal record indicates that fire has a much longer history (>350 Ma). Serotiny (on-plant seed storage) is generally accepted as an adaptation to fire among woody plants. We developed a conceptual model of the...
Author(s): Tianhua He, Claire M. Belcher, Byron B. Lamont, Sim L. Lim
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Irruptive bark beetles usually co-occur with their co-evolved tree hosts at very low (endemic) population densities. However, recent droughts and higher temperatures have promoted widespread tree mortality with consequences for forest carbon, fire and ecosystem services (Kurz et al., 2008; Raffa et al., 2008; Jenkins et al., 2012)....
Author(s): Michael G. Ryan, Gerard Sapes, Anna Sala, Sharon M. Hood
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Quaking aspen is generally considered to be a fire-adapted species because it regenerates prolifically after fire, and it can be replaced by more shade-tolerant tree species in the absence of fire. As early-successional aspen stands transition to greater conifer-dominance, they become increasingly fire prone, until fire returns, and...
Author(s): Douglas J. Shinneman, Kevin Krasnow, Susan K. McIlroy
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Patches of live, dead, and dying trees resulting from bark beetle-caused mortality alter spatial and temporal variability in the canopy and surface fuel complex through changes in the foliar moisture content of attacked trees and through the redistribution of canopy fuels. The resulting heterogeneous fuels complexes alter within-...
Author(s): Chad M. Hoffman, Rodman Linn, Russell A. Parsons, Carolyn Hull Sieg, Judith Winterkamp
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The risk of bark beetle outbreaks is widely predicted to increase because of a warming climate that accelerates temperature-driven beetle population growth and drought stress that impairs host tree defenses. However, few if any studies have explicitly evaluated climatically enhanced beetle population dynamics in relation to climate-...
Author(s): Christian Temperli, Thomas T. Veblen, Sarah Hart, Dominik Kulakowski, Alan J. Tepley
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).