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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

890 results

Wildfire area is predicted to increase with global warming. Empirical statistical models and process-based simulations agree almost universally. The key relationship for this unanimity, observed at multiple spatial and temporal scales, is between drought and fire. Predictive models often focus on ecosystems in which this...
Author(s): Donald McKenzie, Jeremy S. Littell
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Across the western United States, the three primary drivers of tree mortality and carbon balance are bark beetles, timber harvest, and wildfire. While these agents of forest change frequently overlap, uncertainty remains regarding their interactions and influence on specific subsequent fire effects such as change in canopy cover....
Author(s): T. Ryan McCarley, Crystal A. Kolden, Nicole M. Vaillant, Andrew T. Hudak, Alistair M. S. Smith, Jason Kreitler
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In this field guide, I use a “systems approach” to aspen ecology and management. We have learned much, though perhaps not adequately communicated, about varying aspen types around our region (Rogers et al. 2014). For example, what new information is available about fire behavior in aspen, and how might we best apply that knowledge...
Author(s): Paul C. Rogers
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Specific objectives of this review are to address the current status and future outlook of aspen across a range of ecosystems in the US Northern Rockies. Specifically, we aim to answer the following questions: Is aspen declining in the Northern Rockies, and if so what are the underlying causes? Where should aspen...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Penelope Morgan, Eva K. Strand, Diane Abendroth
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Synthesis
Prescribed burning is a primary tool for habitat restoration and management in fire-adapted grasslands. Concerns about detrimental effects of burning on butterfly populations, however, can inhibit implementation of treatments. Burning in cool and humid conditions is likely to result in lowered soil temperatures and to produce...
Author(s): Kathryn C. Hill, Jonathan D. Bakker, Peter W. Dunwiddie
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is being stressed across the America West from a variety of sources including drought, herbivory, fire suppression, development, and past management practices. Rich assemblages of plants and animals that utilize aspen forests, as well as economic values of tourism, grazing, hunting,...
Author(s): Paul C. Rogers, Jody A. Gale
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mountain big sagebrush is a widely distributed shrub native to the western United States. Mountain big sagebrush ecosystems support hundreds of plant and animal species, including several sagebrush obligates. The distribution of mountain big sagebrush has been reduced since European-American settlement, and is likely to be further...
Author(s): Robin J. Innes
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Synthesis
A 106 acre (43 ha) aspen clone lives in the Fishlake National Forest in south-central Utah. Clones are comprised of multiple aspen stems, called ramets, which are genetically identical. This particular colony of ramets was named “Pando” (Latin for “I spread”) by researchers believing it to be the largest living organism on earth....
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
We collected field and remotely sensed data spanning 10 years after three 2003 Montana wildfires to monitor ecological change across multiple temporal and spatial scales. Multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis was used to create post-fire maps of: char, soil, green (GV) and non-photosynthetic (NPV) vegetation from high-...
Author(s): Sarah A. Lewis, Andrew T. Hudak, Peter R. Robichaud, Penelope Morgan, K.L. Satterberg, Eva K. Strand, Alistair M. S. Smith, J Zamudio, Leigh B. Lentile
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Our understanding of how climate and fire have impacted quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) communities prior to the 20th century is fairly limited. This study analysed the period between 4500 and 2000 cal. yr BP to assess the pre-historic role of climate and fire on an aspen community during an aspen-dominated period.
Author(s): Vachel A. Carter, Andrea R. Brunelle, John D. Shaw, Thomas A. Minckley, R. Justin DeRose, Simon C. Brewer
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).