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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

353 results

The growing frequency of large wildland fires has raised awareness of the ‘wildfire paradox’ and the ‘firefighting trap’ that are both rooted in the fire exclusion paradigm. However, a paradigm shift has been unfolding in the wildland fire community that seeks to restore fire ecology processes across broad landscapes. This would...
Author(s): Timothy Ingalsbee
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest managers in the United States must respond to the need for climate-adaptive strategies in the face of observed and projected climatic changes. However, there is a lack of on-the-ground forest adaptation research to indicate what adaptation measures or tactics might be effective in preparing forest ecosystems to deal with...
Author(s): Linda Nagel, Brian J. Palik, Michael A. Battaglia, Anthony W. D'Amato, James M. Guldin, Christopher W. Swanston, Maria K. Janowiak, Matthew P. Powers, Linda A. Joyce, Constance I. Millar, David L. Peterson, Lisa Ganio, Chad Kirschbaum, Molly R. Roske
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This study investigates how federal, state, and private corporate forest owners in a fire-prone landscape of southcentral Oregon manage their forests to reduce wildfire hazard and loss to high-severity wildfire. We evaluate the implications of our findings for concepts of social–ecological resilience. Using interview data, we...
Author(s): Susan Charnley, Thomas A. Spies, Ana M. G. Barros, Eric M. White, Keith A. Olsen
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This proceedings of a workshop summarizes presentations and discussions on ways in which science can help wildland fire planning and management be more strategic, reduce costs, and ultimately increase resilience to wildland fire, both on the land and in communities affected by fire. Its organization follows the structure of the...
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
In this paper, we summarize key findings from a special issue of the journal Rangeland Ecology & Management examining socioecological aspects of woodland expansion and management actions to address this threat in sagebrush and prairie ecosystems. We highlight species and ecosystem outcomes that may result from recent...
Author(s): Richard F. Miller, David E. Naugle, Jeremy D. Maestas, Christian A. Hagen, Galon Hall
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
We use the simulation model Envision to analyze long-term wildfire dynamics and the effects of different fuel management scenarios in central Oregon, USA. We simulated a 50-year future where fuel management activities were increased by doubling and tripling the current area treated while retaining existing treatment strategies in...
Author(s): Ana M. G. Barros, Alan A. Ager, Michelle A. Day, Haiganoush K. Preisler, Thomas A. Spies, Eric M. White, Robert J. Pabst, Keith A. Olsen, Emily K. Platt, John D. Bailey, John P. Bolte
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Since 2009, the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service has promoted an “all lands approach” to forest restoration, particularly relevant in the context of managing wildfire. To characterize its implementation, we undertook an inventory of what we refer to as fire-focused all lands management (ALM) projects, defined as projects...
Author(s): Susan Charnley, Erin C. Kelly, Kendra L. Wendel
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires across western North America have increased in number and size over the past three decades, and this trend will continue in response to further warming. As a consequence, the wildland–urban interface is projected to experience substantially higher risk of climate-driven fires in the coming decades. Although many plants,...
Author(s): Tania L. Schoennagel, Jennifer Balch, Hannah Brenkert-Smith, Philip E. Dennison, Brian J. Harvey, Meg A. Krawchuk, Nathan Mietkiewicz, Penelope Morgan, Max A. Moritz, Ray Rasker, Monica G. Turner, Cathy L. Whitlock
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Sharing fire engines and crews between fire suppression dispatch zones may help improve the utilisation of fire suppression resources. Using the Resource Ordering and Status System, the Predictive Services’ Fire Potential Outlooks and the Rocky Mountain Region Preparedness Levels from 2010 to 2013, we tested a simulation and...
Author(s): Yu Wei, Erin J. Belval, Matthew P. Thompson, David E. Calkin, Crystal S. Stonesifer
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
A 106 acre (43 ha) aspen clone lives in the Fishlake National Forest in south-central Utah. Clones are comprised of multiple aspen stems, called ramets, which are genetically identical. This particular colony of ramets was named “Pando” (Latin for “I spread”) by researchers believing it to be the largest living organism on earth....
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).