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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

408 results

High-temporal resolution meteorological output from the Parallel Climate Model (PCM) is used to assess changes in wildland fire danger across the western United States due to climatic changes projected in the 21st century. A business-as-usual scenario incorporating changing greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations until the year...
Author(s): Timothy J. Brown, Beth L. Hall, Anthony L. Westerling
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire whirls are a typically rare but potentially catastrophic form of fire. They are observed during urban and forest fires, where fire "tornadoes" are characterized by large-scale whirling flames which rise in 2 to 360 m diameter vortices from 10 to 1200 m high. These fire whirls accelerate combustion, produce significant suction...
Author(s): Robert N. Meroney
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
The Haines Index, introduced by Haines (1988) as the Lower Atmosphere Severity Index, is designed to gauge how readily the lower mid-troposphere (500 to 4500 m AGL) will spur an otherwise fairly predictable fire to become erratic and unmanageable. Based on stability and moisture, the Haines Index (hereafter, HI) takes on integer...
Author(s): Brian E. Potter, Scott L. Goodrick
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
The fire season of 2000 was used as a case study to assess the value of increasing mesoscale model resolution for fire weather and fire danger forecasting. With a domain centered on Western Montana and Northern Idaho, MM5 simulations were run at 36, 12, and 4-km resolutions for a 30 day period at the height of the fire season....
Author(s): Jeanne L. Hoadley, Miriam L. Rorig, Kenneth Westrick, Larry S. Bradshaw, Sue A. Ferguson, Scott L. Goodrick, Paul A. Werth
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Application of crown fire behavior models in fire management decision-making have been limited by the difficulty of quantitatively describing fuel complexes, specifically characteristics of the canopy fuel stratum. To estimate canopy fuel stratum characteristics of four broad fuel types found in the western United States and...
Author(s): Martin E. Alexander, Ronald H. Wakimoto
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire behavior predictions and forecasts are vital to tactical planning on wildland firefighting incidents. One major source of uncertainty in fire behavior predictions is spatial variation in the wind fields used in the fire models. In most cases wind data are limited to only a few specific locations, none of which may be actually...
Author(s): Jason M. Forthofer, Bret W. Butler, Kyle S. Shannon, Mark A. Finney, Larry S. Bradshaw, Richard D. Stratton
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Catchpole et al. (1998) reported rates of spread for 357 heading and no-wind fires burned in the wind tunnel facility of the USDA Forest Service's Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana for the purpose of developing models of wildland fire behavior. The fires were burned in horizontal fuel beds with differing characteristics...
Author(s): Ralph M. Nelson
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recently there has been discussion in the National Wildland Fire Coordination Group (NWCG) fire danger and fire weather working teams about the impact of observations from different anemometer heights and more importantly, averaging times, on inputs to fire management systems such as National Fire Danger Rating System (Deeming and...
Author(s): Larry S. Bradshaw, Eugene Petrescu, Isaac C. Grenfell
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
A 21-yr gridded monthly fire-starts and acres-burned dataset from U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, and Bureau of Indian Affairs fire reports recreates the seasonality and interannual variability of wildfire in the western United States. Despite pervasive human influence in western fire regimes,...
Author(s): Anthony L. Westerling, Timothy J. Brown, Alexander Gershunov, Daniel R. Cayan, M. D. Dettinger
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The paper discusses wildfire growth simulated by the FARSITE model using high-resolution wind fields over complex terrain extracted from operational runs of the MM5 weather forecast model supported by the USDA FS Rocky Mountain Center (RMC: http://www.fs.fed.us/rmc/). The original 12-km resolution wind field (simulated by MM5) has...
Author(s): Karl F. Zeller, Ned Nikolov, John S. Snook, Mark A. Finney, Jason M. Forthofer
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).