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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

295 results

The 2000 Valley Complex wildfire burned in steep montane forests with ash cap soils in western Montana, USA. The effects of high soil burn severity on forest soil hydrologic function were examined using rainfall simulations (100mmh-1 for 1 h) on 0.5-m2 plots. Infiltration rates, sediment yields and sediment concentrations were...
Author(s): Peter R. Robichaud, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner, Frederick B. Pierson, Kenneth E. Spaeth, Louise E. Ashmun, Corey A. Moffet
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The project addressed the following tasks: 1) Review and summarize the technical details of major FEIS. 2) Quantify the uncertainty of the components of burned area, fuel loading, and emission factors of each FEIS. 3) Quantify the uncertainty of emissions estimated by each FEIS at scales relevant to modeling ozone, PM2.5 NAAQS, and...
Author(s): Wei Min Hao, Shawn P. Urbanski, Helen T. Naughton
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Previous research has focused on quantifying fuel loadings and using operational fire behavior models to understand changes in fire severity following MPB outbreaks. In this study however, researchers used direct field measurements taken from the 2012 Pole Creek Fire that burned in lodgepole pine forests in central Oregon’s Eastern...
Author(s): Northwest Fire Science Consortium
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Woody plant expansion is a global phenomenon that alters the spatial distribution of nutrients, biomass, and fuels in affected ecosystems. Altered fuel patterns across the landscape influences ecological processes including fire behavior, fire effects, and can impact post-fire plant germination and establishment. The purpose of this...
Author(s): Nathan I. Weiner, Eva K. Strand, Stephen C. Bunting, Alistair M. S. Smith
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increasing rates of natural disturbances under a warming climate raise important questions about how multiple disturbances interact. Escalating wildfire activity in recent decades has resulted in some forests re-burning in short succession, but how the severity of one wildfire affects that of a subsequent wildfire is not fully...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire regime characteristics in North America are expected to change over the next several decades as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Although some fire regime characteristics (e.g., area burned and fire season length) are relatively well-studied in the context of a changing climate, fire severity has received less...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Carol Miller, John T. Abatzoglou, Lisa M. Holsinger, Marc-Andre Parisien, Solomon Z. Dobrowski
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
There is a widespread view among land managers and others that the protected status of many forestlands in the western United States corresponds with higher fire severity levels due to historical restrictions on logging that contribute to greater amounts of biomass and fuel loading in less intensively managed areas, particularly...
Author(s): Curtis M. Bradley, Chad T. Hanson, Dominick A. DellaSala
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fire smoke is inevitable. Size and intensity of wildland fires are increasing in the western USA. Smoke-free skies and public exposure to wildland fire smoke have effectively been postponed through suppression. The historic policy of suppression has systematically both instilled a public expectation of a smoke-free...
Author(s): D.W. Schweizer, Richard Cisneros
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
High-intensity wildfires are one of the leading causes of severe soil erosion in western U.S. watersheds. This erosion can lead to disruptive deposits of sediment in reservoirs and water supply systems. Fuel treatments such as controlled burns and forest thinning can reduce wildfire intensity and help preserve topsoil. But while...
Author(s): Brian Cooke
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Determining how the frequency, severity, and extent of forest fires are changing in response to changes in management and climate is a key concern in many regions where fire is an important natural disturbance. In the USA the only national-scale fire severity classification uses satellite image change-detection to produce maps for...
Author(s): Thomas R. Whittier, Andrew N. Gray
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).