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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

140 results

Recent large and severe outbreaks of native bark beetles have raised concern among the general public and land managers about potential for amplified fire activity in western North America. To date, the majority of studies examining bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire severity in the U.S. Rocky Mountains have focused on...
Author(s): Robert A. Andrus, Thomas T. Veblen, Brian J. Harvey, Sarah Hart
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Although there is acute concern that insect-caused tree mortality increases the likelihood or severity of subsequent wildfire, previous studies have been mixed, with findings typically based on stand-scale simulations or individual events. This study investigates landscape- and regional-scale wildfire likelihood following outbreaks...
Author(s): Garrett W. Meigs, John L. Campbell, Harold S. Zald, John D. Bailey, David C. Shaw, Robert E. Kennedy
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increased wildfire activity and recent bark beetle outbreaks in the western United States have increased the potential for interactions between disturbance types to influence forest characteristics. However, the effects of interactions between bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent wildfires on forest succession remain poorly...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Penelope Morgan, Chad M. Hoffman
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Irruptive bark beetles usually co-occur with their co-evolved tree hosts at very low (endemic) population densities. However, recent droughts and higher temperatures have promoted widespread tree mortality with consequences for forest carbon, fire and ecosystem services (Kurz et al., 2008; Raffa et al., 2008; Jenkins et al., 2012)....
Author(s): Michael G. Ryan, Gerard Sapes, Anna Sala, Sharon M. Hood
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Patches of live, dead, and dying trees resulting from bark beetle-caused mortality alter spatial and temporal variability in the canopy and surface fuel complex through changes in the foliar moisture content of attacked trees and through the redistribution of canopy fuels. The resulting heterogeneous fuels complexes alter within-...
Author(s): Chad M. Hoffman, Rodman Linn, Russell A. Parsons, Carolyn Hull Sieg, Judith Winterkamp
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The risk of bark beetle outbreaks is widely predicted to increase because of a warming climate that accelerates temperature-driven beetle population growth and drought stress that impairs host tree defenses. However, few if any studies have explicitly evaluated climatically enhanced beetle population dynamics in relation to climate-...
Author(s): Christian Temperli, Thomas T. Veblen, Sarah Hart, Dominik Kulakowski, Alan J. Tepley
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The recent mountain pine beetle (MPB) outbreak across western North America's interior lodgepole pine forests has altered the landscape such that the majority of wildfires in the region will now burn through MPB-affected stands. Study of plant community response to these combined disturbances is critical for our understanding and...
Author(s): Marc Edwards, Meg A. Krawchuk, Philip J. Burton
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The final webinar in the Future Forest Webinar Series provided an example of how managers utilized available science to address questions about post-epidemic forest conditions. Assessments of current conditions and projected trends, and how these compare with historical patterns, provide important information for land management...
Author(s): Claudia Regan, Barry Bollenbacher, Rob Gump, Michael Hillis
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
The degree to which recent bark beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks may influence fire severity and postfire tree regeneration is of heightened interest to resource managers throughout western North America, but empirical data on actual fire effects are lacking. Outcomes may depend on burning conditions (i.e., weather during...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, William H. Romme, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The Future Forest Webinar Series facilitated dialogue between scientists and managers about the challenges and opportunities created by the mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic. The series consisted of six webinar facilitated by the USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station, the Northern and Rocky Mountain Regions, and the Colorado Forest...
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).