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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

3269 results

The biogeochemical and stoichiometric signature of vegetation fire may influence post-fire ecosystem characteristics and the evolution of plant ‘fire traits’. Phosphorus (P), a potentially limiting nutrient in many fire-prone environments, might be particularly important in this context; however, the effects of fire on P cycling...
Author(s): Orpheus M. Butler, James J. Elser, Tom Lewis, Brendan Mackey, Chengrong Chen
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Past and current forest management affects wildland fire smoke impacts on downwind human populations. However, mismatches between the scale of benefits and risks make it difficult to proactively manage wildland fires to promote both ecological and public health. Building on recent literature and advances in modeling smoke and health...
Author(s): Jonathan Long, Leland W. Tarnay, Malcolm P. North
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires across western North America have increased in number and size over the past three decades, and this trend will continue in response to further warming. As a consequence, the wildland–urban interface is projected to experience substantially higher risk of climate-driven fires in the coming decades. Although many plants,...
Author(s): Tania L. Schoennagel, Jennifer Balch, Hannah Brenkert-Smith, Philip E. Dennison, Brian J. Harvey, Meg A. Krawchuk, Nathan Mietkiewicz, Penelope Morgan, Max A. Moritz, Ray Rasker, Monica G. Turner, Cathy L. Whitlock
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mechanical fuel treatments are a primary pre-fire strategy for potentially mitigating the threat of wildland fire, yet there is limited information on how they impact shrubland ecosystems. Our goal was to assess the impact of mechanical mastication fuel treatments on chaparral vegetation and to determine the extent to which they...
Author(s): Teresa J. Brennan, Jon E. Keeley
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is being stressed across the America West from a variety of sources including drought, herbivory, fire suppression, development, and past management practices. Rich assemblages of plants and animals that utilize aspen forests, as well as economic values of tourism, grazing, hunting,...
Author(s): Paul C. Rogers, Jody A. Gale
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Logging to ‘salvage’ economic returns from forests impacted by natural disturbances has become increasingly prevalent globally. Despite potential negative effects on biodiversity, salvage logging is often conducted, even in areas otherwise excluded from logging and reserved for nature conservation, inter alia because strategic...
Author(s): Simon Thorn, Claus Bassler, Roland Brandl, Philip J. Burton, John L. Campbell, Rebecca Cahall, Jorge Castro, Chang-Yong Choi, Tyler Cobb, Daniel C. Donato, Ewa Durska, Joseph B. Fontaine, Sylvie Gauthier, Christian Hebert, Torsten Hothorn, Richard L. Hutto, Eun-Jae Lee, Alexandro B. Leverkus, David B. Lindenmayer, Martin K. Obrist, Josep Rost, Sebastian Seibold, Rupert Seidl, Dominik Thom, Kaysandra Waldron, Beat Wermelinger, Maria-Barbara Winter, Michal Zmihorski, Jorg Muller
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Modeling can play a critical role in assessing and mitigating risks posed by natural hazards. These modeling efforts generally aim to characterize the occurrence, intensity, and potential consequences of natural hazards. Uncertainties surrounding the modeling process can have important implications for the development, application,...
Author(s): Matthew P. Thompson, Jord J. Warmink
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires have significant effects on human populations, economically, environmentally, and in terms of their general well-being. Smoke pollution, in particular, from either prescribed burns or uncontrolled wildfires, can have significant health impacts. Some estimates suggest that smoke dispersion from fire events may affect the...
Author(s): Sonya Sachdeva, Sarah M. McCaffrey, Dexter Locke
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Sharing fire engines and crews between fire suppression dispatch zones may help improve the utilisation of fire suppression resources. Using the Resource Ordering and Status System, the Predictive Services’ Fire Potential Outlooks and the Rocky Mountain Region Preparedness Levels from 2010 to 2013, we tested a simulation and...
Author(s): Yu Wei, Erin J. Belval, Matthew P. Thompson, David E. Calkin, Crystal S. Stonesifer
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Prescribed fire is widely applied in western US forests to limit future fire severity by reducing tree density, fuels, and excessive seedlings. Repeated prescribed burning attempts to simulate historical fire regimes in frequent-fire forests, yet there is limited long-term information regarding optimal burn season and frequency. In...
Author(s): Douglas J. Westlind, Becky K. Kerns
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).